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Demographic Notes - Barack Obama Approval Index

 See Demographic Notes for the Election 2008 Presidential Race.

April 11, 2011: Even though enthusiasm is down, 84% of liberal voters still approve of the president’s performance. So do 54% of moderate voters. However, 86% of conservatives disapprove.

November 11, 2010:  The president continues to get strong reviews from Democrats. However, hardly any Republicans offer their approval and 52% of unaffiliated voters Strongly Disapprove.

September 19, 2010: Among voters not affiliated with either major party, just 17% Strongly Approve and 52% Strongly Disapprove.

July 25, 2010 : The number who Strongly Disapprove is just one point below the highest level yet recorded for this president. Just over half of all men (51%) Strongly Disapprove. Just 40% of women share that view.

July 8, 2010 :   Fifty-three percent (53%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 74% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 16% Strongly Approve and 51% Strongly Disapprove.

Overall, 36% say that the president is doing a good or an excellent job when it comes to the economy. Fifty percent (50%) give him poor marks in this area. It’s the first time his poor rating has hit the 50% mark.

On national security issues, 39% give the president good or excellent marks while 40% say poor.

June 27, 2010:   Fifty percent (50%) of Democrats Strongly Approve. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Republicans Strongly Disapprove as do 45% of unaffiliated voters.

June 16, 2010: Forty-eight percent (48%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 75% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 12% Strongly Approve and 52% Strongly Disapprove.

June 4, 2010: Forty-five percent (45%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 70% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 16% Strongly Approve and 46% Strongly Disapprove.

May 26, 2010:  Among men, 20% Strongly Approve and 50% Strongly Disapprove. Among women, those numbers are 27% and 40%.

  May 12, 2010:    Fifty-six percent (56%) of Democrats offer Strong Approval for the president’s performance to date. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Republicans and 51% of unaffiliated voters Strongly Disapprove. See more measure of the president’s performance at the Rasmussen Reports Obama By the Numbers page.

  April 12, 2010:    It is now clear that the Democrats succeeded in energizing their base by passing the President’s proposed health care reform. Since passage of that legislation, the number who Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance has stayed between 28% and 34%. For months prior to passage, the number who Strongly Approved generally stayed between 22% and 27%.

While the Democratic base has been energized, there has been little or no change in views of the President among Republicans and unaffiliated voters. The number of voters who Strongly Disapprove of the President has remained consistently above 40% both before and after passage of the health care law.

  April 5, 2010:    Since the passage of the health care plan, enthusiasm for the President has increased markedly among Democrats. That is reflected in the growing number of voters who Strongly Approve of his performance. However, the passage of health care legislation has had little or no impact on support from Republican and unaffiliated voters. That’s why the number who Strongly Disapprove has remained over 40% for months. It’s also why 53% of voters now trust Republicans more than Democrats on the health care issue.

Friday’s report on job creation has provided a boost in both consumer and investor confidence. Confidence is now back to where it was when Lehman Brothers collapsed in the fall of 2008. Since release of the employment data, the number of unaffiliated voters who Strongly Approve of the President’s performance has increased from 20% to 27%. Forty-five percent (45%) of unaffiliateds still Strongly Disapprove.

  March 25, 2010:   The 32% who Strongly Approve of the President is his best total since November. Gains over the past week have come from Democrats and 65% of those in the President’s party now offer such enthusiastic support. However, there has been no change in support for the President from Republicans and unaffiliated voters.

  March 23, 2010:   Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Democrats now Strongly Approve of the President’s performance while 70% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 23% Strongly Approve and 45% Strongly Disapprove.

  March 17, 2010:   Among men, 19% Strongly Approve and 42% Strongly Disapprove. Among women, 29% Strongly Approve and 41% Strongly Disapprove.

  February 4, 2010:   A look at data for the full week ending Sunday shows that among Very Liberal voters, 93% offer the President their approval. Among those who are Somewhat Liberal, 85% approve. At the other extreme, 84% of Very Conservative voters disapprove. So do 79% of Somewhat Conservative voters.

  January 30, 2010:    Looking only at interviews conducted on the two nights following the speech, it is clear that the President enjoyed a bounce in the polls and that the bounce came from members of his own party. On the morning of the speech, 50% of Democrats Strongly Approved of the President’s performance. On the two nights following the speech, that number jumped to 65%. There was essentially no change among Republican and unaffiliated voters.

  January 18, 2010:   Fifty-seven percent (57%) of liberals Strongly Approve while 65% of conservatives Strongly Disapprove. Among political moderates, 32% Strongly Approve and 23% Strongly Disapprove.

  December 22, 2009:   Seventy-seven percent (77%) of Democrats approve while 88% of Republicans and 62% of unaffiliated voters disapprove.

  December 14, 2009:   Seventy-two percent (72%) of Democrats now offer their approval while 80% of Republicans disapprove. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, just 36% approve.

Seventy-seven percent (77%) of liberals approve while 76% of conservatives disapprove. The bad news for the President is that there are a lot more conservatives in the country than liberals. However, he gets a bit of a boost because 57% of moderate voters still offer their approval.

The President earns approval from 37% of White voters and 98% of African-American voters.

  December 13, 2009:    Today is the second straight day that Obama’s Approval Index rating has fallen to a new low. Prior to the past two days, the Approval Index had never fallen below -15 during Obama’s time in office (see trends).

The 23% who Strongly Approve matches the lowest level of enthusiasm yet recorded. Just 41% of Democrats Strongly Approve while 69% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among voters not affiliated with either major party, 21% Strongly Approve and 49% Strongly Disapprove.

Among those who consider the economy to be the most important issue, just 26% Strongly Approve of the President’s performance while 39% Strongly Disapprove.

Among those who consider fiscal policy issues the most important, just 1% Strongly Approve and 81% Strongly Disapprove.

The President’s Approval Index rating is -2 among voters under 30 and -29 among senior citizens. From an income perspective, the President’s ratings are weakest among those who earn $40,000 to $100,000 annually.

  December 11, 2009:   Just 36% now believe that the president is doing a good or an excellent job handling the economy while 45% rate his performance in this area as poor. Seventy-one percent (71%) of Democrats say he’s doing a good or excellent job on the economy while 74% of Republicans say poor. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 52% give the President poor marks when it comes to the economy.

  November 30, 2009:   Seventy-two percent (72%) believe the President is politically liberal, including 49% who say he is Very Liberal.

  November 25, 2009:   Seventy-four percent (74%) of African-Americans Strongly Approve along with just 19% of white voters. The President earns approval from 97% of African-American voters and disapproval from 61% of white voters.

  November 24, 2009:   Fifty-two percent (52%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 68% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major political party, just 16% Strongly Approve and 51% Strongly Disapprove.

Eighty-one percent (81%) of Democrats approve as do 33% of unaffiliated voters. Eighty-three percent (83%) of Republicans disapprove.

  November 23, 2009:   For the first time in the Obama Administration, the Approval Index has been in negative double digits for nine straight days. Among men, the President’s Approval Index rating is -20. Among women, it is -7

  November 15, 2009:   Fifty-six percent (56%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 66% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 20% Strongly Approve and 47% Strongly Disapprove.

  November 12, 2009:   The President earns approval from 50% of women and 42% of men.

  November 8, 2009:   Sixty-four percent (64%) of liberal voters Strongly Approve while 68% of conservative voters Strongly Disapprove. Those numbers are even higher among those who are "very" liberal or conservative.

  October 22, 2009:    Fifty percent (50%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 66% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove of his performance. Among those not affiliated with either major political party, 18% Strongly Approve and 42% Strongly Disapprove.

  October 14, 2009:   Eighty-five percent (85%) of Democrats approve. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of Republicans disapprove as do 61% of voters not affiliated with either major party .  

  September 14, 2009:   Eighty-four percent (84%) of Democrats approve while 78% of Republican disapprove. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 43% offer a positive assessment and 56% give a negative review.

  September 2, 2009:   While much commentary has been written about how tough August was for Democrats, a review of the data suggests July was really the tougher month. The President’s Job Approval ratings fell more sharply in July than August.   Additionally, the number of people who consider themselves Democrats fell to a two-year low in July before inching up slightly in August. Overall,   37.3% of Americans now consider themselves Democrats while 32.6% are Republicans.

  August 31, 2009:   Eighty-one percent (81%) of Democrats approve while 83% of Republicans disapprove. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 66% disapprove.

  August 23, 2009:    Prior to today, the number who Strongly Approved of the President’s performance had never fallen below 29%. Some of the decline has come from within the President’s own party. Just 49% of Democrats offer such a positive assessment of the President at this time.

At the other end of the spectrum, today’s total for Strongly Disapprove matches the highest level yet recorded. The 41% mark was reached just once before and that came one week ago today. Seventy percent (70%) of Republicans now Strongly Disapprove along with 49% of those not affiliated with either major party.

  August 22, 2009:    Eighty-eight percent (88%) of liberals at least somewhat approve while 79% of conservatives at least somewhat disapprove. Conservative Democrats remain more supportive of the President than other conservatives.

  August 20, 2009:    Overall, 50% of voters say they at least somewhat approve of the President's performance. That figure has stayed in a very narrow range between 47% and 51% every single day for more than a month. Prior the July 8th, his approval rating had never fallen below 52%. Fifty percent (50%) now disapprove.

  August 11, 2009:   So far in August, the President’s Approval Index rating has ranged from -4 to -9. That’s an improvement from the last week in July when his ratings ranged from -8 to -12.

  August 10, 2009:    Fifty-six percent (56%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 70% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 22% Strongly Approve and 40% Strongly Disapprove.

  August 9, 2009:    The President earns approval from 85% of Democrats while 84% of Republicans disapprove. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 42% give the President their approval.

  August 5, 2009:   Fifty-eight percent (58%) of liberals Strongly Approve while 66% of conservatives Strongly Disapprove.

  July 27, 2009:   Fifty-six percent (56%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of his performance
 while 72% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove.
 

  July 23, 2009:    Overall, 49% of voters say they at least somewhat approve of the President's performance. Today marks the first time his overall approval rating has ever fallen below 50% among Likely Voters nationwide. Fifty-one percent (51%) disapprove.

Eighty-three percent (83%) of Democrats continue to approve of the President’s performance while 80% of Republicans disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 37% offer a positive assessment. The President earns approval from 51% of women and 47% of men.

  July 22, 2009:   The President earns approval from 83% of Democrats but 81% of Republicans disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major party, opinion is fairly evenly divided.

  July 21, 2009:   Among men, 26% Strongly Approve and 36% Strongly Disapprove. Women are evenly divided. The President's Approval Index is positive among those under 30, even among 30-somethings, and negative among those 40 and older.

  July 20, 2009:   The President earns approval from 41% of white voters, 97% of black voters, and 58% of all other voters.

  July 18, 2009:   Fifty-eight percent (58%) of Democrats now Strongly Approve of the President while 63% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 43% Strongly Disapprove.

  July 9, 2009:   There is a gender gap when it comes to perceptions of Obama’s performance. By a 46% to 27% margin, men Strongly Disapprove. Women are more evenly divided—33% Strongly Approve and 30% Strongly Disapprove.

  June 29, 2009:   Thirty-seven percent (37%) of women Strongly Approve along with 28% of men. Sixty-two percent (62%) of Democrats offer that positive an assessment while 56% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove.

  June 21, 2009:    Sixty percent (60%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of the President’s performance but only 8% of Republicans share that view. Sixty-one percent (61%) of Republicans Strongly Disapprove.

  June 12, 2009:   Sixty-two percent (62%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance while 62% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Those not affiliated with either party are evenly divided.

Among all voters, the number who Strongly Approve has generally stayed between 34% and 38% for the past three months. During that time, the number who Strongly Disapprove has generally stayed between 27% and 32%.

  May 29, 2009:    Among liberal voters, the President may be benefitting from changing the subject. The number of liberal voters who Strongly, rather than Somewhat, approved of his performance slipped during recent discussions concerning the Guantanamo Bay prison camp. While liberal voices complained that the President was yielding too much ground on his decision to close the camp, support for actually closing the Guantanamo facility has fallen to 38%. Seventy-one percent (71%) of liberal voters now Strongly Approve of the President’s performance, up from 60% just before the Sotomayor announcement. Another 21% of liberals Somewhat Approve.

Seventy percent (70%) of Democrats now Strongly Approve of the President’s performance.

  May 7, 2009:   Among those who view national security as most important, 51% Strongly Disapprove. Strong disapproval is even higher—64%--among those who consider fiscal policy issues most important.

  May 6, 2009:   Seventy-seven percent (77%) of liberal voters Strongly Approve, a view that is shared by just 15% who are politically conservative. Most conservatives (54%) Strongly Disapprove.

The President’s overall approval rating has stayed between 54% and 58% every day since April 1 and every day but one for the past two months.

  May 5, 2009:   Forty-two percent (42%) of women Strongly Approve along with 30% of men. Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 56% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Ninety-five percent (95%) of African-American voters approve, as do 50% of white voters and 58% of all other voters.

  April 29, 2009:   Seventy-six percent (76%) of African-Americans Strongly Approve along with 28% of white voters and 36% of all other voters. Among men, the President’s reviews are evenly divided—34% Strongly Approve and 34% Strongly Disapprove. Women offer a more positive assessment—36% Strongly Approve and 28% Strongly Disapprove.

  April 28, 2009:   The President’s ratings are as you would expect them to be approaching his 100th day in office with strong support from his own party, strong opposition from the other party, and those not affiliated with either party in between. Sixty-four percent (64%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance while 54% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. A plurality of unaffiliateds don’t have a strong opinion one way or the other.

  April 21, 2009:   Thirty-six percent (36%) of women Strongly Approve along with 31% of men. At the same time, 35% of men Strongly Disapprove. That view is shared by 29% of women.

  April 20, 2009:   Eighty-four percent (84%) of Democrats give the President their approval while 74% of Republicans disapprove.

  April 7, 2009:   Seventy-one percent (71%) of liberal voters Strongly Approve while 52% of conservative voters Strongly Disapprove.

  April 6, 2009:   Sixty-two percent (62%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 52% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Eighty-seven percent (87%) of Democrats approve while 70% of Republicans disapprove.

  April 1, 2009:   Eighty-four percent (84%) of African-Americans Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance along with 31% of all other voters. Among both men and women, 37% Strongly Approve. However, 34% of men Strongly Disapprove, a view shared by just 24% of women.

  March 26, 2009:   Men and women are equally likely to voice Strong Approval of the President. However, 38% of men Strongly Disapprove while just 23% of women offer such a negative assessment.

  March 17, 2009:   Eighty-seven percent (87%) of Democrats offer their approval while 75% of Republicans voice disapproval. Those not affiliated with either major party are evenly divided.

  March 15, 2009:   Thirty-seven percent (37%) of both men and women Strongly Approve of the President’s performance. However, there is a gender gap when it comes to offering a negative assessment. Thirty-six percent (36%) of men Strongly Disapprove along with 27% of women.

  March 14, 2009:   Sixty-six percent (66%) of Democrats Strongly Approve and 54% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. As for those who are unaffiliated with either major political party, they are evenly divided between positive and negative reviews.

  March 13, 2009:    Among those who see the economy as the most important issue facing the nation, 46% Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance while 21% Strongly Disapprove. Among the smaller number who view national security as most important, 36% Strongly Approve and 39% Strongly Disapprove. For those who are primarily concerned with fiscal policy issues, just 18% voice a positive assessment while 37% take the opposite view.

  March 12, 2009:   Among investors, an equal number Strongly Approve and Strongly Disapprove of the President’s performance. Among those who do not invest, 43% Strongly Approve and 21% Strongly Disapprove. Among working Americans, the President receives his best ratings from government workers while entrepreneurs are most likely to voice a strongly negative opinion.

  March 9, 2009:   Thirty-two percent (32%) now Strongly Disapprove of the President’s performance, the highest level of disapproval measured to date. The rising negative is driven by Republicans, 58% of who Strongly Disapprove of Obama’s performance. Since Inauguration Day, Republican opposition has doubled.

  March 5, 2009:   Seventy-two percent (72%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of the President’s performance while 52% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Voters not affiliated with either major party are fairly evenly divided.

  March 4, 2009:   The President gets better ratings from women (+21) than men (+10). He earns a +61 rating from African-American voters, a +6 from White voters and a +34 from all other voters.

  March 2, 2009:   Seventy-seven percent (77%) of liberals Strongly Approve of the President’s performance while 54% of conservatives Strongly Disapprove. Among political moderates, 42% Strongly Approve and 16% Strongly Disapprove.

  February 20, 2009:   One month after Inauguration Day, the President gets much stronger reviews from non-investors than investors. Among those with money in the market, 33% Strongly Approve while 29% Strongly Disapprove. Among those who do not invest, 45% Strongly Approve while 21% take the opposite view. The President also does much better with government employees than with private sector workers.

Ideologically, 69% of liberals Strongly Approve along with 46% of political moderates and 13% of conservatives.

  February 19, 2009:   Forty-one percent (41%) of women Strongly Approve of Obama as President along with 34% of men. Thirty percent (30%) of men Strongly Disapprove along with just 20% of women.

Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 48% of Republicans Strongly Disapprove. Among those not affiliated with the two major parties, 29% Strongly Approve and 26% Strongly Disapprove.

  February 17, 2009:   Ninety-one percent (91%) of Democrats at least somewhat approve of the President’s performance. That view is shared by 57% of unaffiliated voters and 28% of Republicans.

  February 14, 2009:   Additionally, the number who Strongly Disapprove of the President’s performance reached a new high today. Forty-eight percent (48%) of Republican voters nationwide now voice such a negative opinion, up from 29% in the first polling after inauguration day.

Sixty-six percent (66%) of political liberals Strongly Approve of the President’s performance while 50% of conservatives Strongly Disapprove.

  February 12, 2009:   Seventy-three percent (73%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of the President’s performance along with 10% of Republicans and 37% of those not affiliated with either major political party. Since Monday, those numbers reflect a seven-point gain among Democrats, a one-point decline among Republicans, and an eight-point gain among unaffiliated voters.

  February 10, 2009:   The economy remains the top issue for 51% of voters nationwide. Seventeen percent (17%) cite national security issues as the highest priority while 12% see fiscal issues such as government taxes and spending as most important. The economy is ranked number one by Republicans, Democrats, and unaffiliated voters. Republicans and Democrats both rank national security second. However, among unaffiliated voters, concerns and fiscal issues are seen as the top priority by 20%.

  February 7, 2009:    Following a week in which the partisan divide in Washington heated up, the number of Republicans who Strongly Approve of the President slipped to single digits—9% now, down from12% a week ago. Slippage among Democrats was even more dramatic, from 76% a week ago to 64% today.

As for those not affiliated with either major political party, 29% now Strongly Approve of the President and 24% Strongly Disapprove. A week ago, those figures were 41% Strongly Approve and 27% Strongly Disapprove.

  February 5, 2009:   Sixty-seven percent (67%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of the President’s performance along with 13% of Republicans and 30% of those not affiliated with either major party. Seventy-six percent (76%) of African-Americans are that upbeat about the President as are 34% of whites and 39% of all other voters. Women give him better reviews than men.

  February 3, 2009:   Seventy-one percent (71%) of political liberals and 16% of conservatives Strongly Approve. Those figures are down from 77% and 21% a week ago.

  February 2, 2009:   While the President’s ratings remain high, the number who Strongly Disapprove has risen from 16% immediately following his inauguration to 24% today. This appears to be a natural reaction as the unifying nature of the inauguration gives way to the challenging realities of governing in times of a challenging economy. Forty-five percent (45%) of political conservatives now Strongly Disapprove of Obama’s performance.

  January 30, 2009:   Seventy-five percent (75%) of Democrats Strongly Approve of the President’s performance along with 30% of unaffiliated voters and 14% of Republicans. Since Obama’s inauguration, the number of people saying the country is heading in the right direction has jumped to 27%.

  January 29, 2009:   Fifty-two percent (52%) say the President is doing a good or an excellent job on economic issues and 50% say the same about national security issues.

  January 28, 2009:   Seventy-four percent (74%) of voters nationwide say Obama is at least as ethical as most politicians, including 43% who say he’s more ethical than his peers       

Obama gets better ratings from non-Investors than Investors. From an educational perspective, he does best among those who have never attended college or those who have a graduate degree. Middle income Americans, particularly those earning $40,000 to $75,000 a year, give the President lower ratings than other voters.

Thirty-eight percent (38%) of entrepreneurs Strongly Approve of the way Obama is handling his new job. That view is shared by 40% of those who work for someone else in the private sector, 43% of government employees, 44% of retirees, and 52% of those who are not in the workforce.

  January 27, 2009:   Among those who see the economy as the top issue, 55% Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance. He also gets such upbeat ratings from 64% of those who view domestic issues as tops. Among national security voters, 19% Strongly Approve. Nineteen percent (19%) of cultural issue voters Strongly Approve as do 11% of fiscal policy voters.

  January 26, 2009:   Forty-six percent (46%) of women strongly approve along with 36% of men. Eighty-one percent (81%) of African-American voters Strongly Approve along with 37% of White voters. Among those who see the economy as the most important issue, 55% Strongly Approve.

At the same time, the President’s negatives have risen a bit since he assumed office and 20% now Strongly Disapprove of his performance. That stems largely from growing disapproval from conservatives. The higher negatives give Obama a Presidential Approval Index rating of +21, his lowest rating as President or President-elect since before Thanksgiving.

  January 25, 2009:   Not surprisingly, partisan and ideological divides remain clear when it comes to evaluating the President. The number of political conservatives who Strongly Disapprove of Obama’s performance has increased from 29% on the morning of Inauguration Day to 38% today. Only 17% of conservatives Strongly Approve.

At the other extreme, 79% of liberal voters Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance to date while just 5% Strongly Disapprove.

On a partisan basis, the President earns a +68 rating from Democrats, a -23 rating from Republicans, and a +8 from those not affiliated with either major party. Among the unaffiliated voters, 32% Strongly Approve and 24% Strongly Disapprove.

  January 24, 2009:    The 44% who Strongly Approve is just a point below the highest rating for Obama as either President or President-elect. The 18% who Strongly Disapprove is the highest negative for Obama November 30. The number of political conservatives who Strongly Disapprove has increased from 29% on the morning of Inauguration Day to 34% today.

  January 22, 2009:    Despite the sense of unity that filled the air on inauguration day, strong ideological and partisan differences remain when it comes to the new President. He earns rave reviews from political liberals—80% Strongly Approve and just 4% Strongly Disapprove. However, among conservatives, just 20% Strongly Approve and 24% Strongly Disapprove.

The gap is even bigger on a partisan, rather than ideological basis. Seventy-six percent (76%) of Democrats Strongly Approve while 4% Strongly Disapprove. Among Republicans, however, just 13% Strongly Approve and 25% Strongly Disapprove.

This gives Obama a Presidential Approval Index rating of +76 among liberal voters, a +72 among Democrats, a -4 among conservatives, and a -12 among Republicans.

  January 21, 2009:   Seventy-nine percent (79%) of liberal voters Strongly Approve of the President’s performance along with 43% of political moderates and 22% of conservatives. Generationally, Obama gets his best reviews from those under 30 (58% Strongly Approve) and his weakest reviews from those aged 30-49 (38% Strongly Approve).

  January 19, 2009:    Obama, the first African-American elected President, earns a +73 rating from Democrats and a -18 among Republicans. As for voters not affiliated with either major party, 34% Strongly Approve and 22% Strongly Disapprove to give the President-elect a +12 rating on the day before his inauguration.

  January 16, 2009:    Most Democrats (56%) list the economy as the top concern while 14% are interested in domestic spending programs and only 11% say national security is the top priority.

Among Republicans, 38% say the top issue is the economy, 27% say national security, and 14% are most concerned about fiscal issues.

Among unaffiliated voters, 40% say the economy, 19% national security, and 17% fiscal policy.

  January 8, 2009:   Seventy-three percent (73%) of political liberals Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance since the election. That upbeat assessment is shared by 45% of political moderates and 23% of political conservatives.

  January 7, 2009:   Seventy-four percent (74%) of political liberals Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance since the election. That upbeat assessment is shared by 42% of political moderates and 20% of political conservatives.

  January 6, 2009:   Obama earns a +70 rating from Democrats and a -15 rating from Republicans. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 31% Strongly Approve and 15% Strongly Disapprove for a +16 rating.

The President-elect earns a +76 rating from African-American voters, a +23 rating from White voters, and a +14 rating from Hispanic voters.

  December 22, 2008:   Seventy-seven percent (77%) of African-American voters Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance to date while only 4% Strongly Disapprove. Those figures give the President-elect a +73 rating among African-American voters. Among white voters, 38% Strongly Approve and 16% Strongly Disapprove for a rating of +22.

On a partisan basis, Obama earns a +67 rating from Democrats and a -14 from Republicans. Among those not affiliated with either major party, 39% Strongly Approve and 15% Strongly Disapprove for a +24 rating.

Obama does better among women (+36) than men (+21).

  December 18, 2008:   Obama has asked Pastor Rick Warren to deliver the Invocation at his inaugural. This is widely seen as a gesture to Evangelical Christians, a group that is less supportive of Obama than the nation at large. Just 30% of Evangelical Christians Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance to date while 24% Strongly Disapprove. Forty-one percent (41%) of other Protestants Strongly Approve while 15% Strongly Disapprove. As for Catholic voters, the numbers are 38% Strongly Approve and 16% Strongly Disapprove.

From a different perspective, those who rarely or never attend Church have a much higher opinion of Obama—52% Strongly Approve and just 12% Strongly Disapprove. The more regularly that someone attends Church, the lower Obama’s ratings.

  December 16, 2008:   As always, women are somewhat more pessimistic than men when it comes to the economy. The Consumer Index among men is at 62.4 while it’s at 52.6 among women. The reverse is true for the President-elect--Obama earns a +18 rating among men and a +34 among women Obama has earned a +70 rating among Democrats and a -20 from Republicans. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 36% Strongly Approve and 16% Strongly Disapprove for a +20 rating.

  December 14, 2008:   Obama has earned a +71 rating among Democrats and a -20 from Republicans. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 35% Strongly Approve and 16% Strongly Disapprove for a +19 rating.

  December 13, 2008:    Forty-one percent (41%) of men Strongly Approve while 18% Strongly Disapprove giving the President-elect a +23 rating among men. As for women, the numbers are 45% Strongly Approve and 12% Strongly Disapprove for a +33 rating.

Obama has earned a +70 rating among Democrats and a -17 from Republicans. As for those not affiliated with either major party, 36% Strongly Approve and 15% Strongly Disapprove for a +21 rating.

  December 10, 2008:    Despite recent news stories of liberal concern over Obama appointments, 77% of liberals nationwide Strongly Approve of the President-elect’s performance while only 2% Strongly Disapprove. That gives Obama a +75 Approval Index rating among left-leaning Americans. Most voters see Obama himself as politically liberal.    

As for political conservatives, 19% Strongly Approve while 28% Strongly Disapprove for a -9 Approval Index rating.

Among those who view the economy as the most important issue, 55% give Obama their Strong Approval while 7% Strongly Disapprove (Approval Index rating: +48). As for those who consider nation security most important, 24% Strongly Approve and 28% Strongly Disapprove (Approval Index rating: -4).