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ISRAEL & THE MIDDLE EAST

  • Voters Expect More Of The Same Under New Saudi King

    Few U.S. voters think Saudi Arabia will become a more liberated society following the passing of King Abdullah and the quick succession of his half-brother, King Salman. While fewer voters view the kingdom as an enemy of the United States these days, they criticize its handling of Islamic terrorism and think it gets away with too many human rights abuses.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 22% of Likely U.S. Voters think it is at least somewhat likely that Saudi Arabia will become a freer and more democratic society over the next few years. Sixty-one percent (61%) see those changes as unlikely. This includes just two percent (2%) who think Saudi Arabia will be a more open society and 18% who think that’s Not At All Likely. A sizable 17% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.  

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on January 23-24, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say Taliban Not True to Islam

    Americans strongly believe the Taliban, the Islamic fundamentalist group in Afghanistan who last week took credit for the murder of 130 school children, does not truly represent its faith.

    Just 16% of Likely U.S. Voters think the Taliban represents true Islamic beliefs, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Sixty-nine percent (69%) say the group which ruled its country for six years as the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan does not represent the true beliefs of Islam. Another 16% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 17-18, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Sour on Taliban But Reluctant to Chase Pakistan School Killers

    Voters are hesitant to join in the search for the Taliban killers who massacred 145 people, most of them children, in a school in Pakistan, but the incident has dramatically reduced support for U.S. negotiations with the radical Islamic group to end the war in Afghanistan.

    Just 42% of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States should help Pakistan find the perpetrators of the school massacre and bring them to justice. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 32% are opposed to U.S. involvement in the matter, while another 27% are not sure.(To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 17-18, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Think Americans More Supportive of Israel than Obama, Media Are

    Most voters believe their fellow Americans stand behind Israel more than the Palestinians when it comes to the fighting in Gaza, but they aren’t as sure about the Obama administration or the media here and abroad.

    Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Likely U.S. Voters say that, in the current conflict in Gaza, most Americans are supportive of the Israelis. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only eight percent (8%) believe Americans are more supportive of the Palestinians, while 11% think they are equally supportive of both. Eight percent (8%) think most Americans support neither side. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 10-11, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Are Less Wary of U.S. Involvement in Middle East

    Voters have long expressed little enthusiasm for getting more involved in Middle East politics, but they are slightly less likely to think this involvement hurts both the region and the United States.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters now believe that U.S. involvement in Middle Eastern politics hurts stability in that region, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. That’s down five points from 37% last August.  Just as many (31%) now say U.S. involvement helps stability in the Middle East, up from 25% last year. Twenty-two percent (22%) believe U.S. involvement has no impact on that region, while 15% more aren’t sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 25-26, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 32% Favor Release of Israeli Spy Pollard to Help Peace Talks

    The Obama administration is reportedly proposing to release Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard from prison if it will help keep U.S.-brokered Middle East peace talks alive, but just one-in-three U.S. voters like that idea.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 32% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the release of Pollard, who was sentenced to life imprisonment in 1987 after being convicted of spying on the United States for Israel. Slightly more (37%) oppose Pollard’s release to help advance peace talks between the Israelis and Palestinians. Another 32% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 1-2, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 26% Favor U.S. Military Action if Syria Fails to Destroy Its Chemical Weapons

    Voters generally don’t trust Syria to get rid of all of its chemical weapons as promised, but they still don’t support U.S. military action there even if that's the case.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it’s at least somewhat likely that Syria will destroy all its chemical weapons capabilities on schedule as promised, including just eight percent (8%) who say it’s Very Likely. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey shows that 58% think Syria is not likely to eliminate all of its chemical weapons on schedule, with 24% who say it’s Not At All Likely to do so. Ten percent (10%) aren’t sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 3-4, 2013 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 43% Think Benghazi Will Hurt Hillary Clinton’s Candidacy in 2016

    As CBS-TV’s “60 Minutes” program highlighted Sunday evening, serious questions remain about the murder a year ago of the U.S. ambassador to Libya, and a sizable number of voters think that incident will hurt Hillary Clinton’s chances for the presidency.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only four percent (4%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the circumstances surrounding the murder of Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans in Benghazi, Libya will help Clinton’s candidacy.  Forty-three percent (43%) think those circumstances will hurt the former secretary of State if she runs for the presidency in 2016, but nearly as many (41%) say they will have no impact. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 28-29, 2013 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 47% Favor U.S. Military Action Against Syria If Other UN Countries Involved

    Despite the strong advocacy of President Obama and other top administration officials, most voters oppose U.S. military action against Syria but are much more supportive if other United Nations member countries are involved. Voters are now more critical of the administration’s handling of Syria.

    Just 27% of Likely U.S. Voters favor U.S. military action against Syria in retaliation for that government's use of chemical weapons against its own people. Fifty-nine percent (59%) are opposed to U.S. military action. Fourteen percent (14%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

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    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 6-7, 2013 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology

  • 65% Think Congress Should Decide About Syria

    Despite Secretary of State John Kerry’s announcement yesterday that the United States has proof of the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons against its opponents, just 37% of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States should provide increased military assistance to protect the citizens of Syria.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey, taken Thursday and Friday nights, finds that 40% do not think the United States should get more involved militarily in Syria. Twenty-three percent (23%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

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    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitterand Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 29-30, 2013 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.