If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

ISRAEL & THE MIDDLE EAST

  • Voters Still Pessimistic About Egypt’s Future

    An Egyptian court this week handed down the first guilty verdict and sentencing to ousted President Mohamed Morsi for his role in the arrest and torture of protesters in 2012. American opinions of Egypt’s relationship with the United States haven’t changed, but voters are slightly more confident about the future of Egypt’s democracy than they were just after the violence there reached its peak.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 34% of Likely U.S. Voters think Egypt is likely to become a free, democratic and peaceful nation over the next several years. That’s up slightly from 29% in December and in August of 2013, following widespread violence during the ouster of the Muslim Brotherhood president. In February 2011 just after the overthrow of longtime President Hosni Mubarak, 54% showed this level of optimism for the North African country.

    Fifty-one percent (51%) now say it’s unlikely Egypt will become a free, democratic and peaceful nation anytime soon, down from 55% in the previous survey. These findings include six percent (6%) who say it’s Very Likely Egypt will reach this goal and nine percent (9%) who say that’s Not At All Likely. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 21-22, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • Voters Even More Negative About Arab Spring’s Impact

    As the violence in Yemen escalates, American voters continue to be skeptical about the political changes in the region brought about by the so-called “Arab Spring” and worry they have made the United States less safe. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 1-2, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Are Less Opposed To Netanyahu Speech to Congress

    Voters are a bit more open to the idea of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addressing Congress tomorrow about Iran despite strong protest from the White House, and most consider it important whether their congressional representative is attending.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on February 26-27, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Many Voters See U.S.-Israel Relations Deteriorating

    While American voters aren’t entirely convinced Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu should address Congress about Iran despite protest from the White House, a plurality also believes the relationship between the United States and Israel has gotten colder since President Obama took office.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 42% of Likely Voters think Netanyahu should accept Republican congressional leaders’ invitation to address Congress about Iran even if President Obama does not want him to come. Thirty-five percent (35%) disagree and don’t think the Israeli prime minister should address Congress. Twenty-three percent (23%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on January 29-30, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Expect More Of The Same Under New Saudi King

    Few U.S. voters think Saudi Arabia will become a more liberated society following the passing of King Abdullah and the quick succession of his half-brother, King Salman. While fewer voters view the kingdom as an enemy of the United States these days, they criticize its handling of Islamic terrorism and think it gets away with too many human rights abuses.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 22% of Likely U.S. Voters think it is at least somewhat likely that Saudi Arabia will become a freer and more democratic society over the next few years. Sixty-one percent (61%) see those changes as unlikely. This includes just two percent (2%) who think Saudi Arabia will be a more open society and 18% who think that’s Not At All Likely. A sizable 17% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.  

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on January 23-24, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say Taliban Not True to Islam

    Americans strongly believe the Taliban, the Islamic fundamentalist group in Afghanistan who last week took credit for the murder of 130 school children, does not truly represent its faith.

    Just 16% of Likely U.S. Voters think the Taliban represents true Islamic beliefs, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Sixty-nine percent (69%) say the group which ruled its country for six years as the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan does not represent the true beliefs of Islam. Another 16% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 17-18, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Sour on Taliban But Reluctant to Chase Pakistan School Killers

    Voters are hesitant to join in the search for the Taliban killers who massacred 145 people, most of them children, in a school in Pakistan, but the incident has dramatically reduced support for U.S. negotiations with the radical Islamic group to end the war in Afghanistan.

    Just 42% of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States should help Pakistan find the perpetrators of the school massacre and bring them to justice. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 32% are opposed to U.S. involvement in the matter, while another 27% are not sure.(To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 17-18, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Think Americans More Supportive of Israel than Obama, Media Are

    Most voters believe their fellow Americans stand behind Israel more than the Palestinians when it comes to the fighting in Gaza, but they aren’t as sure about the Obama administration or the media here and abroad.

    Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Likely U.S. Voters say that, in the current conflict in Gaza, most Americans are supportive of the Israelis. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only eight percent (8%) believe Americans are more supportive of the Palestinians, while 11% think they are equally supportive of both. Eight percent (8%) think most Americans support neither side. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 10-11, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Are Less Wary of U.S. Involvement in Middle East

    Voters have long expressed little enthusiasm for getting more involved in Middle East politics, but they are slightly less likely to think this involvement hurts both the region and the United States.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters now believe that U.S. involvement in Middle Eastern politics hurts stability in that region, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. That’s down five points from 37% last August.  Just as many (31%) now say U.S. involvement helps stability in the Middle East, up from 25% last year. Twenty-two percent (22%) believe U.S. involvement has no impact on that region, while 15% more aren’t sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 25-26, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 32% Favor Release of Israeli Spy Pollard to Help Peace Talks

    The Obama administration is reportedly proposing to release Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard from prison if it will help keep U.S.-brokered Middle East peace talks alive, but just one-in-three U.S. voters like that idea.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 32% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the release of Pollard, who was sentenced to life imprisonment in 1987 after being convicted of spying on the United States for Israel. Slightly more (37%) oppose Pollard’s release to help advance peace talks between the Israelis and Palestinians. Another 32% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 1-2, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.