If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

Hillary Doesn't Care That Much About Abortion Rights

A Commentary By Ted Rall

Friday, August 14, 2015

Hillary Clinton's recent attack on fellow presidential hopeful Marco Rubio, R-Fla., over abortion ("offensive," "outrageous" and "troubling," she said) reminded me of something I've been wanting to wonder aloud for some time:   

Why doesn't the Democratic Party call for a federal law legalizing abortion?   

Thanks to the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, abortion is legal. Given the 5-4 balance of the Supreme Court barely in favor of that 1973 decision, however, federal abortion rights could vanish following the next vacancy on the high bench, especially if it happens under a Republican president. (Abortion would remain legal in liberal states.)  

Four decades of legal limbo is enough.   

If Clinton, Bernie Sanders and Congressional Democrats really believe in a woman's right to control her own body -- for the record, I think they do -- they should jointly endorse a bill legalizing abortion throughout the land.   

It is true, of course, that full-throated support for reproductive freedom carries political risks.   

With only 50 percent in support of abortion rights and 35 percent against, Democrats would risk losing some of the conservatives we used to call Reagan Democrats, or just swing voters, especially Catholics. Incredibly, you're more likely to poke someone who likes gay marriage than abortion when you shake a stick.   

Of even greater concern to Democratic strategists is losing leverage over their progressive wing. Following decades of marginalization and watching their political views overlooked in favor of Clintonite "Third Way" centrists, the left is disgruntled, voting and giving donations in smaller numbers. One thing that still motivates these liberals to turn out for Democrats is the prospect of a Republican-controlled Supreme Court, followed by the overturning of Roe v. Wade -- a threat many social-issue liberal Democrats find appalling.  

If Congress legalizes abortion, this motivation goes away -- and leaves a party that went along with the wars against Afghanistan and Iraq, passed welfare reform, and enthusiastically pushed through a spate of free trade agreements viewed by economic populists as corporate giveaways that kill American jobs.    

This is almost certainly why Hillary Clinton talks a good game on abortion -- and that's where it ends. She just doesn't care enough to take a chance.   

Despite the downsides, Clinton, Sanders and the party ought to press for a federal bill. Bill Clinton and Barack Obama played to the polls, the latter endorsing gay marriage, saying his views had "evolved" only after surveys told him it was safe. Voters are starving for leadership, for politicians who point the way forward, telling us where we should go before we form a national consensus.   

Certainly, such a move would solidify support for the party among women by signaling that it is willing to take risks. The bill could go down to defeat. But legislative defeat could become a moral victory, as in Ellen Pao's unsuccessful sex discrimination lawsuit.    

It would also put Congressional Republicans on the spot, forcing them to go on the record as voting against abortion rights -- which most American women support. This tactic, forcing opponents to vote "nay" so you can beat them up with attack ads later, is rarely used by Democrats. I don't understand why. Is the SCOTUS threat really so powerful that it justifies the real possibility that tens of millions of women and girls in conservative Southern states will lose abortion as an option? Aren't strategists worried that, at some point, liberal women in particular will get wise, and ask the same question I'm posing here: why don't Dems even try for a federal abortion-rights bill?   

If nothing else, it would be nice to see an end to the 42-year-old ritual of protests outside the Supreme Court in Washington, attended by pro-choice and pro-life factions yelling insults at each other.  

It's time for American political culture to get real and grow up about abortion. It's silly and weird and unproductive for a major nation to remain so paralyzed so long over such a major issue. Women deserve to be able rely upon more than a flimsy court decision.    

There ought to be a law -- and Democrats should lead the charge.   

Ted Rall, syndicated writer and the cartoonist for ANewDomain.net, is the author of the book "Snowden," the biography of the NSA whistleblower, to be published August 25. Want to support independent journalism? You can subscribe to Ted Rall at Beacon.

COPYRIGHT 2015 TED RALL

See Other Political Commentaries.

See Other Commentaries by Ted Rall.

Views expressed in this column are those of the author, not those of Rasmussen Reports. Comments about this content should be directed to the author or syndicate.

Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection, publication and distribution of public opinion information.

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it's in the news, it's in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter and various media outlets across the country.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll and commentaries are available for free to the general public. Subscriptions are available for $4.95 a month or 34.95 a year that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on upcoming elections, consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers, Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs and a full history of our data.

To learn more about our methodology, click here.