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  • Carly Fiorina, Identity Politics and the Death of Feminism by Ted Rall

    If you doubt that the politics of identity have triumphed over the debate over ideas, read the New York Times story about how "Carly Fiorina Both Repels and Enthralls Liberal Feminists."

  • The Baby Butchers and Their Media Butchers By Michelle Malkin

    "I'd say a lot of people want liver." 

    The propagandists of Planned Parenthood don't want you to remember that earlier this summer the group apologized for the "tone" of one of its top officials, Deborah Nucatola, who casually hawked unborn baby parts to undercover journalists from the Center for Medical Progress as she swilled wine and chomped on a salad. 

  • The Dogs That Aren't Barking in the 2016 Campaign By Michael Barone

    Sherlock Holmes famously solved the mystery of the Silver Blaze by noting the dog that didn't bark in the night. It strikes me that in this wild and woolly campaign cycle there have been numerous dogs not barking in the night, or in the daytime either.

    Start with the race for the Democratic nomination, which has not unrolled as predicted. Every observer knows Hillary Clinton's numbers have been falling and Bernie Sanders' numbers have been rising, leading her in Iowa and New Hampshire. Every observer is waiting to see if Joe Biden will run, perhaps in time for the Democrats' first debate two weeks from now.

  • Kentucky Governor: With a Month to Go, Bevin Has Squandered His Edge By Larry J. Sabato and Kyle Kondik

    For months we’ve argued that Kentucky’s increasing lean toward the Republican Party and the state’s antipathy toward President Barack Obama gave businessman Matt Bevin, the Republican nominee, a generic edge in the open Kentucky gubernatorial race. While Bevin is not a strong candidate, we thought that ultimately those inherent advantages — advantages that have nothing to do with Bevin’s campaign — nonetheless made him a small favorite over state Attorney General Jack Conway (D).

  • Good Riddance! By Thomas Sowell

    The impending departure of Speaker of the House John Boehner gives the House Republicans a real opportunity to accomplish something. But an opportunity is not a guarantee. It is a little like a football team being first down and goal at the ten-yard line.

    You have a good chance of scoring a touchdown from there -- if you can get your act together. But you could also find yourself having to settle for a field goal. Or for a missed field goal.

  • Welcome to Wealthy Middle Eastern Thug Privilege By Michelle Malkin

    You've heard endlessly about "white privilege" from the professional social justice warrior gripers. But rarely does that crusading crowd -- or their spiritual leaders in the White House -- acknowledge the brutal impact of wealthy Middle Eastern thug privilege in America.

    I'm looking especially at you, Barack, Michelle and Valerie Jarrett (who hosted Black Lives Matter activists at 1600 Pennsylvania last week).

  • The Cult of Victims by John Stossel

    The world has enough real problems without declaring everyone a "victim."

  • ‘Teflon Don’ Morphs into a Real Candidate By Charles Hurt

    First they ignored him. Then they mocked him. Then they tried tearing him down.

    With each failure to destroy Donald Trump, the political experts and establishment stooges only made him stronger. And now they don’t have a clue what to do.

  • Is There Any Precedent in History for Donald Trump? By Michael Barone

    In November 1964 a crowd of 5,000 attended the opening of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge, then the longest suspension bridge in the world. Presiding were New York Mayor Robert Wagner, Gov. Nelson Rockefeller and transportation and parks czar Robert Moses. Also in the crowd was a teenager named Donald Trump.   

  • The 'Affordable Housing' Fraud By Thomas Sowell

    Nowhere has there been so much hand-wringing over a lack of "affordable housing," as among politicians and others in coastal California. And nobody has done more to make housing unaffordable than those same politicians and their supporters.

    A recent survey showed that the average monthly rent for a one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco was just over $3,500. Some people are paying $1,800 a month just to rent a bunk bed in a San Francisco apartment.