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POLITICAL COMMENTARY

  • The Trump Card By Thomas Sowell

    With Hillary Clinton's multiple misdeeds coming to light and causing her political problems, reflected in her declining support in the polls, both she and the Democratic Party have reason to be concerned. But both of them may yet be rescued by "The Donald," who can turn out to be their Trump card.

    Donald Trump has virtually no chance of becoming even the Republican Party's candidate in 2016, much less being elected President of the United States.

  • Obama Bets Nuclear Deal Will Change Iran's Regime; Few Agree by Michael Barone

    Faute de mieux. That means "for want of something better" in Secretary of State John Kerry's second language. It's also the best case made by its journalistic defenders for approval of the nuclear weapons deal Kerry negotiated with Iran. Or to be more exact, for rallying 34 votes in the Senate or 146 votes in the House to uphold a presidential veto of a congressional vote to disapprove.

  • Desperate Dems Recycle Planned Parenthood's Mammogram Lie By Michelle Malkin

    The gruesome hits keep coming for the baby butchers of Planned Parenthood. President Obama and his top health officials have one last-ditch response left: Quick, hide behind the imaginary mammogram machine!

  • Asymmetrical Politics: Republicans Act Like an Unruly Mob, Democrats Like a Regimented Army By Michael Barone

    As the presidential campaign heats up, and we head into the first debate among the 16 declared Republican candidates, there is an asymmetry between the two political parties.

    Republican voters have been seething with discontent toward their party's officeholders and have not become enchanted with any one of 15 more or less conventional politicians who are running. Democratic voters support their officeholders with lockstep loyalty and seem untroubled by the serious flaws of their party's clear frontrunner.

  • Eight Decades of Debate By Kyle Kondik and Geoffrey Skelley

    Next week begins what has become a regular presidential primary tradition: the debates. As a way of previewing them, we decided to look back at the history of primary debates. Readers may be surprised to learn that primary debates existed before the advent of televised general election debates in 1960. Less surprising is that the number of debates has been steadily increasing over time, although it appears that both parties will have fewer in 2016 than they did in their last competitive primary seasons (2012 for Republicans, 2008 for Democrats).

  • Governed by Zealots By John Stossel

    The government's environmental rules defeat even environmentalists.    

  • Obama Cronyism + Your Personal Data = Trouble by Michelle Malkin

    It's the most far-reaching scandal in Washington that no one wants to talk about: Tens of millions of federal employees had their personal information hacked as a result of Obama administration incompetence and political favoritism.

  • Is America Entering a New Victorian Era? by Michael Barone

    Forty-seven years ago, the musical "Hair" opened on Broadway. Elderly mavens -- the core theater audience then, unlike the throngs of tourists flocking to cheap movie adaptations today -- were instructed that America was entering an "Age of Aquarius." The old moral rules were extinct: we were entering a new era of freedom, experimentation and self-expression.

  • Documented Irresponsibility By Thomas Sowell

    People who entered the United States illegally may be called "undocumented" in politically correct circles, but what is all too well documented is the utter irresponsibility of both political parties in dealing with immigration issues

    Both Democratic and Republican administrations have left the border with Mexico porous for years -- porous not just for Mexicans but for anybody else, including terrorists from the Middle East.

  • Conservatism With a Heart? It's Called Socialism. By Ted Rall

    American conservatives are staring down the barrel of a future that looks increasingly bleak for them due to two major demographic shifts: The country is becoming more ethnically diverse, and younger voters -- Gen Xers, millennials, and presumably whoever comes next -- are left cold or even repelled by the Republican Party's Christian evangelical base and "social issues," i.e. its obsession over who everyone has sex with. Anticipating their imminent irrelevance, some on the right say it's time to reboot conservatism by bringing it more in line with the increasingly tolerant tone of most Americans on social issues, and by addressing their economic concerns.