If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.



  • House 2016: Is It Possible for Republicans to Kick Away Their Majority? By Kyle Kondik

    Republicans working to maintain the party’s historically large House majority appear relatively confident about the aspects of the next campaign they can control: incumbent performance, recruitment of challengers, staffing, fundraising, etc. What concerns them are the aspects of the campaign they do not control.

  • Gitmo Extended Stay America Suites in Colorado? Hell No! By Michelle Malkin

    Liberal readers have scoffed at my repeated warnings about the dangerous prospect of an enemy combatant dump on American soil. Over the years, I've flagged the Obama administration's scouting forays in Illinois, Kansas and South Carolina. Now, the White House is considering my adopted home, Colorado, as the new digs for the dregs of Gitmo.

    If there was ever a time for Coloradans of all political stripes to unite under the "Not in My Backyard" banner, this is it.

  • Escaping Tyranny By John Stossel

    North Korea is called the "worst place on earth" for good reason. Thousands of people are tortured. Some North Koreans eat rodents to try to survive, and many starve anyway. In winter, they freeze. No one but the dictator has any true freedom, and no one is allowed to leave.

    One person who understands that is Yeonmi Park. Now she's 22. But for 16 years, she did amazing things "In Order to Live." That is the title of her new book.

  • Obama Offers ‘Crazy List’ As Silver Bullet To Gun Massacres By Charles Hurt

    Like the bumper sticker says, a gun’s only serious enemies are rust and politicians. At least rust has principles.

    Of course, nothing inspires shameless partisan ambition in politicians like an awful human tragedy. So, in a spasm of deceitful grandstanding, President Obama immediately sprang into the spotlight of last week’s terrible shooting in Oregon to peddle some of the worn, broken and rejected political wares he’s never been able to offload on anyone before.

  • Charlatans and Sheep By Thomas Sowell

    One of the many painful signs of the mindlessness of our times was a recent section of the Wall Street Journal, built around the theme "What's Holding Women Back in the Workplace?"

    Whenever some group is not equally represented in some institution or activity, the automatic response in some quarters is to assume that someone has prevented equality of outcomes.

  • Policy Reform That Comes From Outside (and in Spite of) Washington by Michael Barone

    Not all important public policy reforms come from Washington. Really lasting reforms can percolate from the bottom up, brewed by citizens with a grievance pushing state and local governments to act.

  • Carly Fiorina, Identity Politics and the Death of Feminism by Ted Rall

    If you doubt that the politics of identity have triumphed over the debate over ideas, read the New York Times story about how "Carly Fiorina Both Repels and Enthralls Liberal Feminists."

  • The Baby Butchers and Their Media Butchers By Michelle Malkin

    "I'd say a lot of people want liver." 

    The propagandists of Planned Parenthood don't want you to remember that earlier this summer the group apologized for the "tone" of one of its top officials, Deborah Nucatola, who casually hawked unborn baby parts to undercover journalists from the Center for Medical Progress as she swilled wine and chomped on a salad. 

  • The Dogs That Aren't Barking in the 2016 Campaign By Michael Barone

    Sherlock Holmes famously solved the mystery of the Silver Blaze by noting the dog that didn't bark in the night. It strikes me that in this wild and woolly campaign cycle there have been numerous dogs not barking in the night, or in the daytime either.

    Start with the race for the Democratic nomination, which has not unrolled as predicted. Every observer knows Hillary Clinton's numbers have been falling and Bernie Sanders' numbers have been rising, leading her in Iowa and New Hampshire. Every observer is waiting to see if Joe Biden will run, perhaps in time for the Democrats' first debate two weeks from now.

  • Kentucky Governor: With a Month to Go, Bevin Has Squandered His Edge By Larry J. Sabato and Kyle Kondik

    For months we’ve argued that Kentucky’s increasing lean toward the Republican Party and the state’s antipathy toward President Barack Obama gave businessman Matt Bevin, the Republican nominee, a generic edge in the open Kentucky gubernatorial race. While Bevin is not a strong candidate, we thought that ultimately those inherent advantages — advantages that have nothing to do with Bevin’s campaign — nonetheless made him a small favorite over state Attorney General Jack Conway (D).