If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

POLITICAL COMMENTARY

  • House 2016: Gridlock Ahead for a Possible Clinton Administration By Kyle Kondik

    If Hillary Clinton wins the White House, there's a decent chance that she will achieve a historic first, but not the one everybody talks about.

    Clinton could become the first Democratic president in the party's nearly two century-long history* to never control the House of Representatives while she's in office.

  • How the World Has Changed Since World War I By Michael Barone

    Over the past year, I've been reading books inspired by the centenary of World War I, a war with horrific casualties painful to contemplate. What helps in comprehending the scale of the slaughter is a book by one of Bill Gates' favorite authors, the Canadian academic Vaclav Smil, "Creating the Twentieth Century: Technical Innovations of 1867-1914 and Their Lasting Impact."

    Smil leads the reader through the invention and development of electricity, oil production and distribution, the automobile, steelmaking, the telephone, the airplane and the production of synthetic ammonia -- to his mind the most important because without it agriculture couldn't feed the world's 6 billion people.

  • Don't Go! by John Stossel

    It's graduation time! Have we learned much? No.

  • Why Do So Many Eggs Come From Iowa? by Froma Harrop

    An outbreak of bird flu has forced American farmers to kill millions of egg-laying chickens, 32 million in Iowa alone -- hence the rise in egg prices.

  • Can Hillary Clinton Reverse the Six-Year Decline in Democratic Turnout? by Michael Barone

    Bill Clinton won the presidency in 1992 by running as a different kind of Democrat from previous nominees. Hillary Clinton, Anne Gearan of The Washington Post reports, is hoping to win the presidency in 2016 by running as the same kind of Democrat as the current incumbent.

  • Senate 2016: Sorting Out the Democrats' Best Targets By Kyle Kondik

    Former Sen. Russ Feingold’s (D) long-expected decision to challenge Sen. Ron Johnson (R) in a 2016 rematch crystallized for us that Johnson is the most vulnerable incumbent senator in the country . But it also helped put the other top Senate races into context.

    First of all, let’s re-set the scene. Map 1 shows Senate Class 3, which will be contested in November 2016. The 34 seats up next year are lopsidedly controlled by Republicans: They are defending 24 seats, while the Democrats are only defending 10.

  • Dr. Capitalism By John Stossel

    For years, my scientist brother Tom was the nonpolitical Stossel.    

  • Death Penalty for Tsarnaev Hurts Boston By Froma Harrop

    Why was 21-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sentenced to die in a state so generally opposed to capital punishment? A recent Boston Globe poll found that only 19 percent of Massachusetts residents wanted the Boston Marathon bomber put to death. The state hasn't seen an execution since 1947.

    That sentence happened because national politics took the matter out of local hands. The federal government forced a death penalty trial. Only those open to a death sentence were allowed to serve on the jury. That made the jury members unrepresentative of the local population and the outcome preordained.

  • The Two-Point-Something Campaign by Michael Barone

    This spring it seems as if there have been two-point-something Republican presidential candidacy announcements per week. And, since she made her own announcement April 12, Hillary Clinton has answered an average of about two-point-something questions from the press each week.

  • British Pollsters Failed in the Increasingly Difficult Struggle to Get it Right by Michael Barone

    The world may have a polling problem. That's the headline on a blogpost by Nate Silver, the wunderkind founder of FiveThirthyEight. It was posted on 9:54 ET the night of May 7, as the counting in the British election was continuing in the small hours of May 8 UK Time.