If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

Gitmo Extended Stay America Suites in Colorado? Hell No!

A Commentary By Michelle Malkin

Wednesday, October 07, 2015

Liberal readers have scoffed at my repeated warnings about the dangerous prospect of an enemy combatant dump on American soil. Over the years, I've flagged the Obama administration's scouting forays in Illinois, Kansas and South Carolina. Now, the White House is considering my adopted home, Colorado, as the new digs for the dregs of Gitmo.

If there was ever a time for Coloradans of all political stripes to unite under the "Not in My Backyard" banner, this is it.

The feds have already polluted our waters in the name of protecting us. Nobody at the EPA has paid any price for the disastrous Gold King Mine spill that turned the Animas River brighter than a Halloween pumpkin. The last thing we need is an influx of feckless Obama bureaucrats flooding our state's correctional facilities with jihadists in orange jumpsuits (in the name of national security, of course).

What part of "Leave us the hell alone!" don't they understand?

On Friday, White House officials disclosed to the press that a U.S. Defense Department fishing expedition will take place over the next two weeks at both state and federal prisons here in the Rocky Mountain State.

One of the potential Gitmo Extended Stay America sites is a medium-security area of supermax -- home of convicted 9/11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui, shoe bomber Richard Reid, 1993 World Trade Center plotter Ramzi Yousef, millennium bomb plotter Ahmed Ressam, "dirty bomb" plotter Jose Padilla and 1998 African U.S. embassy bomb plotter Wadih el-Hage. President Obama has bragged repeatedly about his administration's ability to ensure public safety inside and outside any jihadist hotels in our own backyards.

But despite the supposedly strictest security measures imposed of them, the pre-existing stateside supermax terrorist population has caused numerous headaches from day one -- sending jailhouse letters to terror cell correspondents around the world; communicating by tapping on the pipes; organizing hunger strikes to force Bureau of Prisons officials to transfer them away from high-security detention; and suing successfully for the right to spread Islam behind bars to other inmates.

(That last victory came at the hands of shoe bomber Reid, himself a Muslim convert by an extremist imam he met in a British prison before his failed attempt to bring down American Airlines Flight 63 in 2001.)

Let's not forget that convicted WTC mastermind Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman, aided by terrorists' little helper Lynne Stewart, smuggled coded messages of Islamic violence while behind bars to violent outside followers despite a judicial isolation order. After serving less than half of her 10-year sentence for aiding terrorism, Stewart walked free in January 2014 thanks to President Obama's "compassion" order. Amid persistent concerns that he could be similarly released, the 76-year-old Abdel-Rahman was reportedly transferred from Colorado's supermax to the Butner Federal Medical Center in North Carolina sometime in the last year for health reasons.

Most recently, U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch was forced in August to order what reporters called "a near total clampdown" on another jailed Muslim menace because of the "high probability" that he would order a terrorist attack from his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in lower Manhattan. Prosecutors have tied Muhanad Mahmoud Al-Farekh to al-Qaida terror plots in Pakistan and New York City.

Everywhere jihadists are housed in civilian prisons, trouble follows. In Australia, jihad militants financed and organized a massive escape plot inside the walls of its most secure supermax facility. Ringleader Bassam Hamzy, a devotee of Osama bin Laden, converted inmates to Islam in droves. The jailbreak scheme was busted, but Hamzy continues to make a mockery of the prison -- from which he ran a major drug ring and masterminded a kidnapping on a cellphone smuggled into the facility.

If President Obama is so confident he can contain the jihad virus and prevent homicidal soldiers of Allah from wreaking more havoc in the U.S. prison system, I suggest importing the bottom-of-the-barrel Gitmo goons to an institution near one of the commander in chief's favorite vacation spots in Martha's Vineyard or Kailua.

Or perhaps as a neighboring annex of his presidential library on the south side of Chicago. Legacy!

Michelle Malkin is author of the new book "Who Built That: Awe-Inspiring Stories of American Tinkerpreneurs." Her email address is malkinblog@gmail.com.

COPYRIGHT 2015 CREATORS.COM

See Other Political Commentaries.

See Other Commentaries by Michelle Malkin.

Views expressed in this column are those of the author, not those of Rasmussen Reports. Comments about this content should be directed to the author or syndicate.

Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection, publication and distribution of public opinion information.

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it's in the news, it's in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter and various media outlets across the country.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll and commentaries are available for free to the general public. Subscriptions are available for $4.95 a month or 34.95 a year that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on upcoming elections, consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers, Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs and a full history of our data.

To learn more about our methodology, click here.