If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

Left Coast Tea Party

A Commentary By Debra J. Saunders

Sunday, April 19, 2009

Last Wednesday, conservatives held coast-to-coast "TEA parties" designed to send the message to Washington and state governments that the partiers feel "taxed enough already." The exercise struck me as more than a little out of touch with the political realities of President Barack Obama's America.

The next day, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar held a public hearing in San Francisco on a proposal by the George W. Bush administration to sell federal leases to drill for oil and gas off the California coast. The hearing became the Left Coast equivalent of the right-wing TEA party.

Oregon Gov. Ted Kulongoski, I believe, spoke for all the other anti-drilling Democratic politicians -- there were no Republican or pro-oil pols -- when he said that supporting more oil and gas drilling "sends the wrong message."

Message? Americans use more oil than we produce. Doesn't that send the most powerful message of all? And then there's the message sent last September, when the Democratic Congress allowed a moratorium on new offshore drilling to lapse because of high gasoline prices. In July, a Public Policy Institute of California poll found that 51 percent of Californians supported new drilling off the California coast. Less than a year later, California politicians are banking on the fact that voters have short memories, as they argued that more drilling in the Outer Continental Shelf would be bad for California's economy.

Of course, the Dems talked up wind, solar and wave power as the proper alternatives to more oil. But when Salazar asked whether they would support wind power, Kulongoski admitted Oregonians have an "aesthetic issue" with wind. His people like wave power, which the Department of the Interior sees as nascent. That is, his people like the kind of renewable offshore energy that does not exist here.

Rep. Lynn Woolsey answered that she could accept wind power "if it's not harmful to the environment" and it's visually acceptable. Remember the circus that followed plans to build a wind farm in Nantucket Sound, with the otherwise-environmentally sensitive Kennedy family in opposition? The arguments that drilling critics have used -- as in, drilling is bad for tourism -- may well be used against wind turbines.

My guess is that Salazar will approve new leases for the Gulf Coast, where people value oil jobs more than B & Bs. But as for California, how can President Obama refuse the wishes of Democrats in a state that demands cheap gas to fuel its car culture and then says no to more oil drilling at the voting booth?

When it was Western States Petroleum Association President Joe Sparano's turn to talk, Salazar saluted him for appearing before the hostile crowd and then exhorted the room to give Sparano "a round of applause." The sound that followed was not clapping. Some people held up dollar bills. Sparano had crashed their party.

Sparano noted that California produces about 800,000 barrels of oil a day but consumes almost twice that amount of oil. The Department of the Interior estimates that there are some 10 billion barrels of "technically recoverable" oil off the West Coast. That's enough, Sparano argued, to replace California's foreign oil use for 35 years. If he's half-right, then think of the gains for California and the losses for the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection, publication and distribution of public opinion information.

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it's in the news, it's in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter and various media outlets across the country.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll and commentaries are available for free to the general public. Subscriptions are available for $3.95 a month or 34.95 a year that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on upcoming elections, consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers, Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs and a full history of our data.

To learn more about our methodology, click here.