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Category » Politics

MOST RECENT RELEASES

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Saturday shows that 51% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Forty-seven percent (47%) disapprove (see trends).

    The latest figures include 28% who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 35% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -7.

    Regular updates are posted daily at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls

    A more optimistic America plans to take a Super Bowl break tomorrow, but why isn’t President Obama getting more credit for our improving national disposition?

  • GOP Voters Agree With Romney on Need for A New Face

    Republican voters agree with Mitt Romney that their party should look for someone new to run in 2016.

    In announcing his decision today not to seek the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, Romney said:  “I believe that one of our next generation of Republican leaders, one who may not be as well known as I am today, one who has not yet taken their message across the country, one who is just getting started, may well emerge as being better able to defeat the Democrat nominee. In fact, I expect and hope that to be the case.”

  • Voters Think Obama Getting Tougher With His Opponents

    While voters are more confident in the economy and the direction of the country, attitudes about the quality of President Obama's leadership remain basically unchanged. Voters do recognize, though, that the president is getting more confrontational with his political opponents.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 43% of Likely U.S. Voters think the president is doing a good or excellent job. This is up five points from the three-year low found in November,  but  his positives have generally run in the mid-40s in monthly surveys since he took office. Forty-one percent (41%) now say the president is doing a poor job, in line with findings for the past three years. (To see survey question wording, click here).

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on January 27-28, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Do Democratic Voters Like Their Party Leaders?

    Democratic voters have their complaints with Washington, D.C., but they remain more content with their party’s political representation than Republican voters are.

    Here are some findings from a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey of Likely Democratic Voters:

    -- Forty-six percent (46%) believe Democrats in Congress have done a good job representing Democratic values over the past several years. By comparison, just 24% of Republican voters think their representatives have done a good job upholding party values. But now 42% of Democrats think their legislators have lost touch with Democratic voters throughout the nation, up from 33% last September. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 648 Likely Democratic Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Don’t Want Next Attorney General To Be Like Holder

    Loretta Lynch is soon likely to be the most powerful cop in America, and a big chunk of voters don’t even know who she is. But one thing they do know: They don’t want her to be like Eric Holder, the current U.S. attorney general.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 33% of Likely U.S. Voters have a favorable opinion of the federal prosecutor from Brooklyn, N.Y., whom President Obama has nominated to be the next attorney general. Twenty-nine percent (29%) view her unfavorably. This includes 11% with a Very Favorable opinion and 12% with a Very Unfavorable one. But 38% don’t know enough about her to voice any kind of opinion. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on January 27-28, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Still Rate Obama Poorly on Economic, National Security Matters

    President Obama's overall job approval ratings may have improved since Election Day,  but voter opinions of his handling of the economy and national security have not. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 40% of Likely U.S. Voters think the president is doing a good or excellent job dealing with economic matters, while 42% rate his performance in this area as poor. These findings have changed very little in weekly surveys for the past two-and-a-half years. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on January 25-26, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 9-5% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters More Skeptical Of Right-To-Work Laws

    As Kentucky, Illinois and several other states consider adopting right-to-work laws, voters aren’t as convinced that such laws which ban compulsory union dues have a positive impact on state economies. However, those who currently live in right-to-work states paint a rosier picture.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 35% of Likely U.S. Voters believe right-to-work laws are good for a state’s economy. That’s down 10 points from December 2012. But 26% now say such laws are bad for a state’s economy, up from 22% two years ago. Eleven percent (11%) think right-to-work laws have no impact, while a sizable 28% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on January 25-26, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 35% Say U.S. Heading in Right Direction

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey for the week ending January 25. 

    This finding is up five points from the week before and is the highest level of confidence since March 2013. The number of voters who think the country is heading in the right direction was below 30% most weeks for the past year.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 2,800 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from January 19-25, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Are GOP Voters to the Right of Their Representatives in Congress?

    Republicans are definitely a conservative bunch. Consider these findings from a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey of Likely Republican Voters:

    -- Sixty percent (60%) want to repeal the national health care law and start over, compared to 30% of all voters.  Only 34% of Republicans want to go through the law piece by piece to improve it.

    -- Just 13% think Congress should take no action to stop President Obama’s executive order protecting up to five million illegal immigrants from deportation. Eighty-two percent (82%) of Republicans say Congress should find ways to stop it. Among all voters, 43% want to let the president’s action stand, while 48% want Congress to stop it.

    -- Eighty-three percent (83%) of GOP voters agree with the late Ronald Reagan that big government is the problem, not the solution. Just seven percent (7%) say it’s the solution instead.

    -- Is America overtaxed? Eighty-two percent (82%) of Republicans think so. Only 11% disagree. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 787 Likely Republican Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.