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Right Direction or Wrong Track

29% Say U.S. Heading in Right Direction

Monday, March 30, 2015

Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey for the week ending March 26. 

This finding is up two points from the previous week which marked the lowest level of confidence this year.  The number of voters who think the country is heading in the right direction has been 30% or higher most weeks since mid-December after generally being in the mid- to high 20s since mid-June 2013.

Sixty-three percent (63%) of voters now believe the nation is headed down the wrong track, down a point from the week before.

A year ago at this time, 28% felt the country was heading in the right direction, while 64% thought it was on the wrong track.

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The national telephone survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from March 22-26, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

The older the voter, the more likely he or she is to believe the country is headed in the wrong direction.

Eighty-three percent (83%) of Republicans and 67% of voters not affiliated with either major political party say the country is on the wrong track. Forty-three percent (43%) of Democrats agree, but slightly more (48%) think it’s heading in the right direction.

Black voters are also almost evenly divided over the direction of the country. Sixty-nine percent (69%) of whites and 52% of other minority voters say America's headed down the wrong track.

The more money one earns, the more likely he or she is to think the country is heading in the right direction, but even among those who earn $100,000 or more a year, more than half say the country is headed down the wrong track. 

Five years after its passage by Congress, attitudes about the national health care law remain largely unchanged: Voters expect it to increase health care costs and hurt the quality of care.

Voters still think U.S. public schools fall short when it comes to providing a world-class education and teaching Western values.

Television is a big part of Americans’ lives. But with new technology like online streaming services changing the face of entertainment, do Americans watch TV differently than before?

One-in-three cable or satellite television subscribers opt for premium cable channels, but TV viewers are looking elsewhere to watch movies

Americans are slightly ahead of last year’s pace when it comes to filing their income taxes, perhaps in part because they're even more optimistic they’ll receive a refund.

Crosstabs and historical data are available to Platinum Members only.

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We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it's in the news, it's in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter and various media outlets across the country.

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