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Most Recent Releases

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June 30, 2004

In New York, Weak Labor Market Slips Further

In New York, the Hudson Employment Index slipped two points in June to 88.0. That's down from 90.2 a month ago but up from 85.3 the month before.

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June 30, 2004

In Ohio, Weak Labor Holds Steady

In Ohio, the Hudson Employment Index gained just two-tenths of a point in June to 101.1. That's essentially unchanged from 100.9 a month ago and 100.4 the month before.

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June 30, 2004

In Pennsylvania, Weak Labor Holds Steady

In Pennsylvania, the Hudson Employment Index gained four points in June to 91.7. That's up from 87.6 a month ago and 90.7 the month before.

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June 14, 2004

Workers Perceive Offshore Outsourcing as Threat to Economy, Not Themselves

While 66% of U.S. workers believe that offshore outsourcing of jobs is bad for the U.S. economy, an overwhelming 84 percent believe it is not likely that their job could be moved to an offshore location.

Just 6% say it is very likely that their job could be sent overseas according to a national poll of 2,814 workers released by Hudson Global Resources. The survey was conducted by Rasmussen Reports.

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June 2, 2004

Hudson Employment Index Down to 104.8

The Hudson Employment Index in May declined to 104.8 from 107.1 the previous month. This is the Index's lowest reading this year, although it remains up nearly five percent over December 2003.

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May 21, 2004

23% Say Their Firms Outsource Jobs to Entrepreneurs

Company outsourcing of jobs to smaller firms and the self-employed has created a created a large pool of entrepreneurs who derive revenue from large companies.

Data collected as part of the Hudson Employment Index shows that more than 9 million workers now work in this segment of the economy. Many of these workers would probably have been employed directly by large companies at an earlier point in time.

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May 5, 2004

Hudson Employment Index Up to 107.1

The Hudson Employment Index inched up to its highest level of the year this month at 107.1. Last month, the Index was at 106.8. Thirty-three percent (33%) of workers say that their employers will hire more employees in the coming months.

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April 10, 2004

GOP, Democrats See Different Economies

Republicans and Democrats have entirely different perspectives on the U.S. economy.

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March 31, 2004

Hudson Employment Index Steady at 106.8

The Hudson Employment Index remained steady this month at 106.8. That's essentially unchanged from last month's figure of 106.9. Overall, employee optimism about the workforce is up 7% from the beginning of the year.

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March 4, 2004

Hudson Employment Index Up 1.5

The Hudson Employment Index gained gained another point-and-a-half this month, signaling a more positive outlook on employment conditions.

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February 4, 2004

Hudson Employment Index Up 5.4

The Hudson Employment Index gained 5.4 points this month, signaling a more positive outlook on employment conditions.

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January 7, 2004

Hudson Data Suggests U.S. Workers will Jump Ship

Despite general satisfaction with their jobs, 60 percent of U.S. workers would seriously consider changing positions given the opportunity, according to survey data used to compile the premiere release of the Hudson Employment Index. Even among those individuals who are happy with their current job, a majority (52 percent) would consider moving on if offered a new position.

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December 26, 2003

What a Difference a Year Makes!

One year ago today, America's economic confidence was low and heading even lower. The Rasmussen Consumer Index kept falling in the week after Christmas until it reached the lowest level of 2002 on the very last day of that year. At 93.8, the economic confidence of American consumers had fallen more than 30 points in nine months.