Pt only Florida Senate: Rubio (R) Grows His Lead Over Crist (I), Meek (D)

Republican Marco Rubio remains the front-runner in Florida's contentious three-way U.S. Senate race.

The latest Rasmussen Reports statewide telephone survey of Likely Voters shows Rubio, a former speaker of the Florida House, picking up 43% of the vote, while Republican Governor Charlie Crist who is running as an independent captures 32%. Democrat Kendrick Meek remains in third place with 20% of the vote. Two percent (2%) prefer some other candidate, and three percent (3%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

The race remains Solid Republican in the Rasmussen Reports Election 2010 Senate Balance of Power rankings.

Last week, Rubio held a 50% to 25% edge over Crist, his best showing in the race to date. Prior to that time, Rubio has led the race in every survey since July, with his support steadily rising from the mid-30s to the low 40s. During that same period, Crist received 30% to 34% of the vote. Support for Meek, a U.S. congressman since 2003, has climbed from 15% to 23% in those surveys.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

This statewide telephone survey of 750 Likely Voters in Florida was conducted on October 18, 2010 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/-4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.  Additional data from this survey will be released at www.rasmussenreports.com/Florida.

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Who Got Us Into These Endless Wars? By Patrick J. Buchanan

"Isolationists must not prevail in this new debate over foreign policy," warns Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations. "The consequences of a lasting American retreat from the world would be dire."

To make his case against the "Isolationist Temptation," Haass creates a caricature, a cartoon, of America First patriots, then thunders that we cannot become "a giant gated community."

Voters Say Orlando More About Terrorism Than Gun Control

Most voters say the massacre at an Orlando gay nightclub this past weekend is more about terrorism than gun control, but most also agree that someone on a terrorist watch list should not be able to purchase a gun. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 14-15, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls -- Week Ending November 29, 2014

Did Thanksgiving come just in time? After outrage over the expected yet controversial grand jury decision in Ferguson and contention over the president’s executive action on immigration, perhaps Americans needed a day to step back and reflect.

On Monday, the St. Louis County Grand Jury decided not to indict Ferguson police Officer Darren Wilson for the killing of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown back in August. Prior to the decision, most Americans didn’t expect Wilson to be charged with murder, and half said the U.S. Justice Department should not try to charge him for federal crimes related to the Brown shooting.

What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls - Week Ending November 22

Did someone miss the message on Election Day? Actions this week by President Obama and in the Senate suggest that we can look forward to another two years of hyper-intense partisanship.

The president on Thursday announced his long-anticipated plan – without congressional approval – that will allow nearly five million illegal immigrants to remain in this country legally and apply for jobs. Republican leaders, scheduled to take control of the full Congress in January, had asked Obama to delay the decision, saying it would poison their future relations. Most voters oppose the amnesty plan and think the government is not aggressive enough in deporting illegal immigrants.

What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls: Week Ending November 15

Obamacare is back in the news, for better or worse.

The U.S. Supreme Court has opted to hear another legal challenge of the health care law, while the Obama administration hopes the glitches in the federal exchange website have been fixed in time for this weekend’s open health insurance enrollment. Meanwhile, several videos have surfaced showing one of the law’s chief architects saying it was deliberately written in a confusing manner so “stupid” voters wouldn’t realize how much the law could end up costing them.

 

 

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