Pt only California Senate: Boxer (D) Holds Her Edge Over Fiorina (R)

Incumbent Democrat Barbara Boxer still holds a small lead over Republican Carly Fiorina in California’s U.S. Senate race, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports survey of Likely Voters in the state.

Boxer, who is seeking a fourth six-year term, now earns 49% support to Fiorina’s 46%. Two percent (2%) prefer another candidate, and three percent (3%) remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

The race remains a Toss-Up in the Rasmussen Reports Election 2010 Senate Balance of Power rankings as it has for weeks. 

Boxer posted a 48% to 46% lead a week ago. In spite of her powers as an incumbent and California’s strong Democratic leanings, Boxer’s been struggling to widen the gap all year. She’s held a small lead in every survey but one since February with 42% to 49% of the vote. Fiorina, a former CEO of Hewlett-Packard, has earned 38% to 47% support in those same surveys.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 750 Likely Voters in California was conducted on October 27, 2010 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Other data from this survey can be found at www.rasmussenreports.com/California

Rasmussen Reports will release new numbers from the California governor’s race tomorrow.

Boxer’s been in the Senate since 1993. Does her political experience make California voters more likely to support her? How big a factor is the health care bill in this contest? Become a Platinum member and find out.

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Nevada Senate: Heck (R) 44%, Cortez Masto (D) 40%

Republican Joe Heck has pulled slightly further ahead of Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto in the race to replace retiring U.S. Senator Harry Reid in Nevada.

A KTNV-TV 13 Action News/Rasmussen Reports telephone and online survey of Likely Nevada Voters shows Heck with 44% support to Cortez Masto’s 40%. The two were nearly even in late July just after the Democratic National Convention. Heck held a 46% to 37% lead in our first look at the race earlier that month.  Now  six percent (6%) prefer some other candidate, while 11% remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 800 Likely Voters in Nevada was conducted on September 16-18, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Nevada: Trump 42%, Clinton 39%, Johnson 11%

The race remains tight in Nevada, but Donald Trump has once again edged into the lead. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 800 Likely Voters in Nevada was conducted on September 16-18, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

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