Pt only California Senate: Boxer (D) Holds Her Edge Over Fiorina (R)

Incumbent Democrat Barbara Boxer still holds a small lead over Republican Carly Fiorina in California’s U.S. Senate race, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports survey of Likely Voters in the state.

Boxer, who is seeking a fourth six-year term, now earns 49% support to Fiorina’s 46%. Two percent (2%) prefer another candidate, and three percent (3%) remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

The race remains a Toss-Up in the Rasmussen Reports Election 2010 Senate Balance of Power rankings as it has for weeks. 

Boxer posted a 48% to 46% lead a week ago. In spite of her powers as an incumbent and California’s strong Democratic leanings, Boxer’s been struggling to widen the gap all year. She’s held a small lead in every survey but one since February with 42% to 49% of the vote. Fiorina, a former CEO of Hewlett-Packard, has earned 38% to 47% support in those same surveys.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 750 Likely Voters in California was conducted on October 27, 2010 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Other data from this survey can be found at www.rasmussenreports.com/California

Rasmussen Reports will release new numbers from the California governor’s race tomorrow.

Boxer’s been in the Senate since 1993. Does her political experience make California voters more likely to support her? How big a factor is the health care bill in this contest? Become a Platinum member and find out.

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Most Don't Favor Big State Tax On Tax Reform Savings

Democratic legislators in California want large companies to give over at least half the savings they get from the new national tax reform bill to the state government. But most voters aren't ready to go that way in their state.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 33% of Likely U.S. Voters think that such a tax proposal would be good for the state of California economically. Slightly more (36%) disagree, while nine percent (9%) say such a tax would have no impact. Twenty-two percent (22%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 22-23, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Home Schooling Is Not a Crime By Michelle Malkin

It's elementary. Education control freaks will use any excuse to crack down on competition. With two million K-12 students now educated at home (including our 9th grade son), the temptation to exploit the most marginal cases of alleged child abuse by home-schoolers has proven irresistible to statist politicians and government apologists.

Should California Stay or Go?

Will rising tensions between the state of California and the federal government push the so-called "Calexit" initiative over the finish line? Most Americans hope not.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 58% of American Adults think it would be bad for the country if California seceded from the union and became a separate country. Just 22% believe that a Calexit would be good for the country, while nine percent (9%) say it would have no impact. Eleven percent (11%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on January 18 and 21, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Most Voters Want to Continue State Enforcement of Pot Laws

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has announced plans to roll back Obama-era protections that ease federal marijuana laws in states where the drug is legalized. But most voters want to keep marijuana regulated at the state level, not a federal one.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

This survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on January 8-9, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Fewer Voters Want Legal Action Against Sanctuary Cities

The murder trial of the illegal immigrant who allegedly murdered Kate Steinle, the woman behind “Kate’s Law,” began this week, while the topic of sanctuary cities has become a focal point in upcoming state gubernatorial campaigns. But while voters don’t believe sanctuary communities are safe, they’re less enthusiastic about taking legal action against them.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 42% of Likely U.S. Voters think the U.S. Justice Department should take legal action against cities or states that provide sanctuary for illegal immigrants, down from 50% a year ago and 62% in 2015. Just as many (45%) now don’t think the Justice Department should take legal action against these communities, up from 38%. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on October 22-23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

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