If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

OBAMA ADMINISTRATION

  • Voters Favor Probe of Obama Staffers' Use of Intelligence Info

    Republicans strongly suspect that senior Obama administration officials used secret U.S. intelligence information for political ammunition, and voters think that's worth investigating. But few believe criminal charges are likely.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters think Congress or the FBI should investigate whether top officials under President Obama leaked secretly gathered intelligence information to the media to hurt political opponents. Thirty-eight percent (38%) oppose such an investigation. Twelve percent (12%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Not Convinced Obama Wasn’t In On Trump Spying

    Voters are split on whether President Barack Obama or his inner circle were aware that U.S. intelligence agencies were spying on Donald Trump’s campaign, but they don’t believe Obama officials leaked names picked up in the surveillance efforts to the media.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 47% of Likely U.S. Voters think it’s at least somewhat likely Obama or his top aides were aware that the nation's intelligence agencies were spying on the Trump campaign and the Trump transition team, including 32% who believe it’s Very Likely. But 42% don’t think it’s likely, with 27% who say it’s Not at All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on April 5-6, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Say ‘No’ to More Public Anti-Trump Role for Obama

    Former President Obama is reportedly planning a more visible stand against President Trump and the GOP to protect his legacy, but most voters think that’s a bad idea.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 30% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Obama should take a more public role in the Democratic opposition to Trump and his party. Nearly twice as many (58%) disagree and say the former president should not more actively oppose his successor and the GOP. Twelve percent (12%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on March 2 and 5, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

  • 83% Say Trump Likely to Erase Most of Obama's Achievements

    Even as the media lavishes praise on President Obama's legacy, voters strongly believe his successor will wipe out most of the changes made during the Obama years. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on January 15-16, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • For Voters, Obama’s Legacy Is A More Divided America

    President Obama promised America hope and change eight years ago, but voters believe his presidency drove us further apart instead. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on January 15-16, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Rate Obamacare as Obama's Defining Moment

    Voters are conflicted over outgoing President Barack Obama's place in history, but they agree the passage of Obamacare will be the defining marker of his presidency.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 32% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Obama will be remembered most for the national health care law. His handling of social and racial issues, the Iran nuclear deal and his policies on illegal immigration and refugees are all tied for a distant second with nine percent (9%) support each.

    Seven percent (7%) say Obama will be remembered most for his economic stimulus package, while nearly as many say that of the auto industry bailouts (6%) and the killing of Osama bin Laden (5%). Just four percent (4%) think he’ll be mostly remembered for his actions on climate change. A sizable 20%, however, think Obama will be remembered for something else not named in the survey. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on January 15-16, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Daily Obama Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Tuesday shows that 62% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Thirty-eight percent (38%) disapprove.

    The latest figures include 41% of who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 29% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of +12 (see trends).

    Blacks (70%) are twice as likely as whites (37%) and other minority voters (37%) to Strongly Approve of the job the president is doing.

    These are the final approval numbers we will post for Obama. Because Rasmussen Reports’ daily Presidential Tracking Poll is based on three days of surveying, we will not post new numbers again until Friday when we will begin tracking President Trump’s job approval.

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • Obama Closes With Highest Approval of His Second Term

    When tracking President Obama’s job approval on a daily basis, people sometimes get so caught up in the day-to-day fluctuations that they miss the bigger picture. To look at the longer-term trends, Rasmussen Reports compiles the numbers on a full-month basis, and the final results for Obama’s presidency can be seen in the graphics below.

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    Daily tracking results are collected via telephone surveys of 500 likely voters per night. The monthly numbers in this article are based on approximately 10,000 interviews each month with likely voters. The margin of sampling error is less than +/- 1 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.

  • Voters Say Trump Better for Small Business, Too Close to Big Business

    Voters see President-elect Donald Trump as an improvement over President Obama when it comes to the handling of small business issues but are worried that he’ll be too chummy with big business. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 30-December 1, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say No to Obama on Supreme Court

    Hillary Clinton seemed receptive the other day to naming President Obama to the U.S. Supreme Court if she is elected to succeed him this fall. Most voters, however, don’t approve of putting Obama on the high court and still aren’t interested in him running for a third term as president either.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 21% of Likely U.S. Voters think the next president of the United States should name Obama to the U.S. Supreme Court. Fifty-nine percent (59%) oppose such a nomination. Twenty percent (20%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 28 and 31, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.