If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • 62% See GOP Senate Takeover As Likely

    Voters believe more strongly than ever that next Tuesday’s elections will put Republicans in charge of the Senate. Confidence that Democrats will regain control of the House continues to fall.

    Sixty-two percent (62%) of Likely U.S. Voters now believe it is likely Republicans will win a majority in the U.S. Senate this November, according to the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. That’s up from 44% in early January and 54% in July.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 29-30, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology

  • Should Obama Campaign in Your State?

    Voters are evenly divided when asked if President Obama is a plus or a minus to political candidates in their states. But Republicans attach a lot more importance than Democrats do to whether a candidate voted for the president in 2012.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 39% of Likely U.S. Voters think candidates running for reelection in their state should remind voters of their support for the president’s agenda. Another 39% say they should distance themselves from Obama. But a sizable 23% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 25-26, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Whites Are Much More Likely Than Blacks to See A Divided America

    Going into Election Day, white voters are nearly twice as likely as blacks to believe America is a more divided nation than it was four years ago. For one-in-three of all voters, President Obama is what this election is all about.

    Sixty-one percent (61%) of Likely U.S. Voters say America is a more divided nation than it was at the time of the last midterm elections in 2014, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. That’s down slightly from 67% in mid-July. Nine percent (9%) say the nation is less divided now, while 28% believe the level of division is about the same. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 25-26, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology

  • Voters Wary of Lone Wolves, Radical Islamic Terrorism

    Following two deadly incidents in Canada that appear terrorist related, U.S. voters feel more strongly that radical Islamic terrorism is a threat to this country but also acknowledge overwhelmingly that not all so-called “lone wolf” attacks can be prevented.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 86% of Likely U.S. Voters now consider radical Islamic terrorism a threat to the United States. That’s up 11 points from January. Twelve percent (12%) disagree. This includes 50% who say this terrorism is a Very Serious threat and only three percent (3%) who feel it is Not At All a threat. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 23-24, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Americans Are Arguing Less This Election Cycle

    Americans may consider this a more divided country than four years ago, but they’re arguing about it a lot less than they were before the 2012 election.

    Twenty percent (20%) of American Adults say they have gotten into a heated argument with a friend of family member about the upcoming election, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. But that compares to 45% in late October 2012. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted on October 22-23, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 54% Think U.S. Society is Fair and Decent

    Voters continue to think American society is generally fair and decent and a large majority maintain that those who immigrate here should adopt the culture.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters think American society is generally fair and decent. This finding is down four points from July and is the lowest finding since July 2007. Prior to 2013, belief that American society was fair and decent regularly ran in the low-to-mid 60s. Thirty-three percent (33%) say American society is generally unfair and discriminatory, up slightly from last month. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on October 9-10, 2014. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Strongly Support Limits on Food Stamp Recipients

    Beginning next year, Indiana will limit how long some can get food stamps, and voters nationwide strongly support similar limits in their state. Just over half favor fixing a deadline for how long people can receive federal public assistance benefits of any kind.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 65% of Likely U.S. Voters favor a program like Indiana’s in their state that would limit access to food stamps to three months for adults without children who do not find work or do not participate in a 20-hour-a-week job training program. Only 24% oppose such limits in their state, while 12% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters nationwide was conducted on October 21-22, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Less Sour Toward Government Work

    A modest plurality of U.S. voters now thinks the best and brightest should work for the government, though most still don’t believe doing so is more honorable than working in the private sector.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 38% of Likely U.S. Voters believe it’s better for America if the best people take government jobs. Thirty-three percent (33%) disagree and think it’s better for the country if those people go to work in the private sector instead. Another 28% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters nationwide was conducted on October 19-20, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Worry ISIS Is Winning in Iraq

    Few voters believe the United States and its allies are winning the war against the radical Islamic State militants, but a strong majority remains confident that ultimate victory is likely.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 15% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the United States and its allies are winning the war in Iraq. Forty-two percent (42%) believe ISIS is winning, while 31% say neither side holds the advantage. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on October 15-16, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 40% Think U.S. Elections Are Fair

    As Election Day nears, voters remain highly skeptical of their elected representatives and the overall electoral process.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 40% of Likely U.S. Voters think American elections are fair to voters, consistent with the findings for the past couple years and down from a high of 57% just before the 2012 presidential election. Forty-two percent (42%) do not believe U.S. elections are fair, although that's down from the mid- to high 40s in surveys since May 2013. The number who considered elections unfair ran mostly in the 30s in surveys for several years prior to that.  Eighteen percent (18%) are now undecided about how fair elections are. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 13-14, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.