If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Voters Think Overworked U.S. Troops Will Soon Be Fighting In Iraq

    Most voters believe the U.S. military has too many missions these days and think it’s likely that fighting in Iraq will soon be another job for it to do. But while President Obama is reportedly sending 3,500 military personnel to Africa to fight Ebola, voters say patrolling the border to prevent illegal immigration would be a better use for those forces.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 55% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the U.S. military is overstretched these days. Just 31% think the military can adequately handle the number of missions it has. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 17-18, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters See ‘War on Women’ As Politics, Not Reality

    Most voters don’t consider the so-called “war on women” a war at all but see it as just a political tactic. But women are less convinced than men that they share the same political interests.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 22% of Likely U.S. Voters believe there is really a political “war on women” going on. Fifty-nine percent (59%) say the “war on women” is primarily a slogan used for political purposes instead. But 19% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 13-14, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Still Say No to D.C. Statehood

    Most voters still don’t think Washington, D.C. should be a state, and they remain closely divided over whether Congress should give up its long-standing veto power over the city’s laws and budget.

    The U.S. Constitution designates the nation’s capital as a federal district, not a state, and only 24% of Likely U.S. Voters believe that should be changed. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 58% oppose statehood for Washington, D.C. Eighteen percent (18%) are undecided.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 15-16, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Voters Still Want Government to Cut Spending to Boost Economy

    In reacting to the nation’s current economic problems, more voters worry the government won’t do enough than that it will do too much. However, they hope the government’s response is to cut spending, not increase it.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 52% of Likely U.S. Voters are more concerned that the government won't dip enough in responding to the bad economy. Just 38% are more worried that the government will do too much. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 11-12, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Agree with Obama’s Plans to Fight ISIS

    President Obama in a nationally televised speech last week outlined his plans for fighting the radical group that calls itself the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS, also known as ISIL), and voters are mostly supportive of those plans. Just over half also agree with the president that despite its name, the extremist group does not represent the true beliefs of Islam.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 66% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the president's plan for expanding U.S. airstrikes beyond Iraq to Syria to help defeat ISIS. Sixteen percent (16%) oppose this plan, while 18% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on September 11-12, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Oppose Tax, Spending Hikes But Think Obama Disagrees

    Voters continue to believe cutting taxes and government spending will help the economy, but many still expect the Obama administration to do just the opposite.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 41% of Likely U.S. Voters believe taxes will go up under the Obama administration. This is up four points from 37% in June which was the lowest level measured in nearly two years. Just nine percent (9%) think taxes will go down, while 38% say they will stay about the same. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here).

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 9-10, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Just 63% Know Which Parties Control the House and Senate

    Over one-third of Likely U.S. Voters remain unaware which political party controls the House of Representatives and which has a majority in the Senate - less than two months before an election that may put one party in charge of both.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 63% are aware that Republicans have majority control of the House. An identical number (63%) know that Democrats run the Senate.

    Twenty percent (20%) mistakenly believe Democrats control the House, while 17% are not sure. Similarly, 18% think the GOP is in charge in the Senate, but 19% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 9-10, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Do Americans Remember 9/11?

    On the 13th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, most Americans continue to believe the country has changed for the worse and are evenly divided as to whether Americans have forgotten the impact of that horrific day.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 14% of U.S. Adults believe the United States has changed for the better since 9/11. Sixty-one percent (61%) believe America has changed for the worse, though that’s down from 67% a year ago.  Eleven percent (11%) say the country hasn’t changed, but 14% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted on September 6-7, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Americans Feel More Certain Another 9/11 is Looming

    The number of Americans who consider another attack on the scale of September 11, 2001 Very Likely is at its highest level since before the killing of Osama bin Laden. But even though the radical Islamic group ISIS continues to make big threats against the United States from the Middle East, Americans still fear an attack from within more than one from outside.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that two-out-of-three American Adults (67%) think it is at least somewhat likely that another 9/11 will take place in the next 10 years, including 34% who consider it Very Likely. The latter figure is up from 30% a year ago and the highest finding since 2010 when 39% felt another major attack was Very Likely. Bin Laden was killed the following May, and concern dropped somewhat. But only 20% of Americans think a similar attack is unlikely in the next decade, with just three percent (3%) who consider it Not At All Likely. Thirteen percent (13%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted on September 6-7, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Democrats Are More Likely to Vote Early

    Just over half of Americans think they’ll wait to Election Day to cast their ballots even if their state offers early voting.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 41% of Likely Voters in states that allow early voting say they are likely to take advantage of that opportunity. But 52% say they are more likely to wait until Election Day. Seven percent (7%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 7-8, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.