If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Are Trump's Businesses Bad for the Presidency?

    President-elect Donald Trump has assured the American public that his wide array of business dealings around the world won’t impact his decisions as chief executive, but most voters have concerns about whether that will truly be the case. Democrats are far more concerned than other voters are, however.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 60% of Likely U.S. Voters are at least somewhat concerned that Trump’s business interests will influence his decisions during his presidency, including 44% who are Very Concerned. Thirty-eight percent (38%) don’t share this concern, with 16% who are Not At All Concerned. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.  

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 27, 2016  by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Should Presidents Include Political Opponents In Their Cabinets?

    President-elect Donald Trump has been busy meeting with potential members of his Cabinet, including some who were vocal opponents of his campaign. Voters overwhelmingly believe that a president’s Cabinet is important to his administration’s success, but are less sure about the benefits of bringing in political opponents.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that an overwhelming 96% of Likely U.S. Voters believe a president’s Cabinet choices are at least somewhat important to the success of his or her administration, including 78% who say they are Very Important. Just two percent (2%) consider these choices unimportant to the administration’s success. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 27, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters View Trump More Favorably

    Voters have a more positive opinion of president-elect Donald Trump following his unexpected victory than they did throughout his campaign.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters now have a favorable opinion of Trump, up from 39% in October  Still, just as many (48%) view the president-elect unfavorably. These findings include 29% with a Very Favorable opinion of Trump and 36% with a Very Unfavorable one. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 17 and 20, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters More Comfortable With One-Party Rule Compared to 2008

    More than half of voters feel comfortable with the prospect of one party controlling both the Executive and Legislative branches of government, as Republicans will do when Donald Trump enters the White House in January. Democratic voters have changed their tune on this arrangement following Election Day.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 55% of Likely U.S. Voters are at least somewhat comfortable with one party running the White House, the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives. Thirty-nine percent (39%) are not comfortable with this scenario. These findings include 33% who are Very Comfortable with such an arrangement and 20% who are Not At All Comfortable with it. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 17 and 20, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Democrats See A Future for Hillary But Want Party to Follow Bernie

    Following Hillary Clinton's surprise loss to Donald Trump, most voters think it's time for her to quit the public arena, but her fellow Democrats disagree. Still, Democratic voters now believe their party should go more in the direction of Clinton's primary opponent, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 15-16, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Few Think Government Has Their Best Interest In Mind

    The outsider candidate may have won this year’s presidential election, but most voters still don't expect the government to be looking out what's best for them. Republicans are more hopeful than other voters, though. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 9-10, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports and Full Measure News. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Don’t See Anti-Trump Protests Going Anywhere

    Voters are closely divided over whether the street protests against Donald Trump’s election are the product of genuine concern or just being staged by troublemakers. But most agree the protests won’t achieve anything good. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 13-14, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Should Trump Still Investigate Clinton?

    President-elect Donald Trump in a TV interview Sunday night appeared to back away from a campaign vow to name a special prosecutor to investigate defeated Democratic rival Hillary Clinton for her handling of classified information while secretary of State. Most voters think he should drop the idea, but a sizable majority of Republicans disagree.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 41% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Trump administration should continue to investigate Clinton and her closest aides for possible criminal activity, but 52% think it should end any such investigations. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 13-14, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • So Far, So Good, Voters Say of Obama-Trump Truce

    Most voters like the way President Obama has responded to the election of Donald Trump but don’t think the early public peace between the two men says much about the future.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 62% of Likely U.S. Voters rate Obama’s public response to Trump’s election as good or excellent. Only 12% consider the president’s response as poor. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 13-14, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Democrats Don’t Want Their Party To Work With Trump

    Most voters think Democrats should work with Donald Trump once he’s in the White House, but Democrats strongly disagree. Still, voters are more hopeful about the parties cooperating than they’ve been since President Obama’s inauguration in 2009.

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 9-10, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.