If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Voters Think Google, Facebook Spy More Than Government

    When it comes to your privacy, which worries you more – the government or your search engine?

    Several major technology companies like Google, Apple and Facebook supported a recently blocked bill in the U.S. Senate that would have placed tighter restrictions on the National Security Agency’s collection of phone records, but 47% of Likely U.S. voters think such companies are more likely than the government to be monitoring their personal communications and Internet activity. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 32% think the federal government is more likely to be keeping tabs on them. Twenty-one percent (21%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 18-19, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • When It Comes to NSA, Voters Put Preventing Terrorism Ahead of Privacy

    A bill that would have put heavier restrictions on the National Security Agency’s collection of Americans’ phone records  was blocked in the U.S. Senate Tuesday. While voters still aren’t fans of the NSA’s activities, they seem to agree with the bill’s opponents that preventing a terrorist attack is more important than protecting Americans’ privacy right now.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 57% of Likely U.S. Voters believe protecting the country from a possible terrorist attack is more important than protecting the privacy of most Americans. Thirty-three percent (33%) take the opposite view, while 10% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 18-19, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Want Major Spending Cuts But Don't Expect to Get Them

    Most voters still want federal spending cuts across the board but think it’s unlikely they’ll actually happen.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 56% of Likely U.S. Voters think thoughtful spending cuts should be considered in every program of the federal government, consistent with surveying this year but down from a high of 63% in October of last year.  Thirty percent (30%) disagree, while another 14% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 10-11, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

  • Voters Show Tepid Support For Fighting ISIS With Iran

    Voters give a lukewarm endorsement to President Obama's proposal that Iran join in the fight against the radical Islamic group ISIS, but they don't expect it to improve relations between the two countries anytime soon.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 42% of Likely U.S. Voters favor cooperation between the United States and Iran in fighting the extremist Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Thirty-three percent (33%) are opposed to such cooperation, while 24% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 10-11, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters See Election As Rejection of Democrats

    Half of U.S. voters say the Republican takeover of Congress was a repudiation of President Obama’s party rather than an endorsement of the GOP. Democrats don’t disagree.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 30% of Likely U.S. Voters believe last week’s election results were more a vote for the Republicans than a vote against the Democrats. Forty-nine percent (49%) disagree and say the election results were a vote against the Democrats instead. But one-in-five (21%) aren’t sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 8-9, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Continue To Feel U.S. Doesn't Spend Enough on National Security

    With a sympathetic Republican Congress coming in January, voters continue to feel the country isn't spending enough on national security and are more reluctant than they have been in several years to remove U.S. troops from Europe. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 38% of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States does not spend enough on the military and national security. This is down five points from 43% in August, the highest finding in three years of regular tracking, but is more in line with voter attitudes for the past couple years. Twenty-two percent (22%) still believe the United States spends too much on defense, but this view has been trending downward since January 2013 when it reached a record high of 40%. Thirty-one percent (31%) say the country spends about the right amount in this area. (To see survey question wording, click here).

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 6-7, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say ‘No’ to Lame Duck Congress, ‘Maybe’ on Obama’s Nominees

    The current Congress is expected to return this week for a final lame duck session, but most voters consider such sessions a waste of time. They’re almost evenly divided over whether any of President Obama’s nominations should be handled by this Congress or put off until the next one. 

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree that the time between Election Day and the swearing-in of the new Congress should be shorter, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Thirty-two percent (32%) disagree and think the current two-month wait is fine. Seventeen percent (17%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters nationwide was conducted on November 8-9, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Just 10% Think It’s Good That bin Laden’s Killer Has Gone Public

    Americans don’t think it’s great for the country that the Navy SEAL who killed Osama bin Laden has identified himself to the public, but they also don’t believe the government should be able to shut him up.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 10% of American Adults think it’s good for U.S. national security that former Navy SEAL Robert O’Neill is now saying publicly that he killed bin Laden, the Islamic terrorist mastermind behind the 9/11 attacks on the United States. Thirty-four percent (34%) say it’s bad for national security that he has gone public with his story, while slightly more (37%) say it will have no impact. Nineteen percent (19%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter orFacebook

    The survey of 1,000 Adults nationwide was conducted on November 7-8, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 59% Think New GOP Congress Likely to Be A Disappointment

    Meet the new boss, same as the old boss? The ink’s scarcely dry on Tuesday’s ballots, and most voters already expect the new Republican majority in Congress will let them down.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 59% of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is at least somewhat likely that most voters will be disappointed with Republicans in Congress before the 2016 elections. That includes 36% who say it’s Very Likely.

    Just 26% consider it unlikely that the new congressional GOP will be a disappointment to most voters, with seven percent (7%) who say it is Not At All Likely. Fifteen percent (15%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our  polls).    Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 4-5, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • America’s Got the Blues

    Americans are a pessimistic lot these days.

    With Election Day upon us, most predictions see a Republican Congress in the making, and certainly our final surveying suggests that. Changes in the nation’s governorships are likely to be a bit less dramatic.

    But some things are more definite, attitudes we've seen again and again that aren't subject to partisan projections and day-to-day news events.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.