If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Despite Justice Department Challenges, Most Still Favor Voter ID Laws

    A federal judge in North Carolina recently struck down the latest challenge by the U.S. Justice Department to a state law that requires voters to bring photo identification to the polls. Voters continue to strongly support voter ID laws and don't consider them discriminatory.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 74% of Likely U.S. Voters believe all voters should be required to prove their identity before being allowed to vote. Nineteen percent (19%) disagree. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 14-15, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • New High: 43% Say U.S. Doesn’t Spend Enough on National Security

    As tensions remain high with Russia and much of the Middle East, more voters than ever believe the United States is not putting enough money into national security.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 43% of Likely U.S. Voters think the United States does not spend enough on the military and national security. This finding is up from 36% in May and is the highest finding in three years of regular tracking. Twenty-three percent (23%) still believe the United States spends too much on defense, but that's down 17 points from the record high of 40% in January 2013. Thirty percent (30%) say the amount spent in this area is about right. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 12-13, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Think Obama, Congress Are Slackers

    Note to President Obama and Congress: Don’t call voters for a job reference. Voters are evenly divided when asked if the president works harder than they do, but they are overwhelmingly convinced that Congress doesn’t.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 43% of Likely U.S. Voters think President Obama works harder than they do, but just as many (42%) disagree. Fifteen percent (15%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 12-13, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • When It Comes to Government, Voters Opt for Small

    Midway through his presidency in the 1990s, Bill Clinton declared that “the era of big government is over.” Half of Americans wish that were true.

    Just 17% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the era of big government is over, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Fifty-five percent (55%) disagree and say it's still with us. Twenty-eight percent (28%) are undecided.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 6-7, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC.

  • Obama vs. Congress: Voters Say It’s Politics, Not Policy

    President Obama and Republicans in Congress oppose each other on most major issues facing the nation, but few voters believe this political struggle is about substance.

    Just 20% of Likely U.S. Voters think the opposition between the two is mostly due to honest differences of opinion, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Sixty-nine percent (69%) say this opposition is due mostly to partisan politics. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 31- August 1, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Oppose Obama Acting Alone But Don’t Think House Can Stop Him

    Most voters agree with Republicans in Congress that the president does not have the right to change laws without Congress’ approval, but they doubt a House lawsuit will stop him from acting on his own. The House voted last week to sue President Obama for exceeding his constitutional authority by making changes in the new national health care law after it had been passed by Congress. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 22% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the president should be able to change a law passed by Congress if he thinks the change will make the law work better.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 31- August 1, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Few Voters See Post-Gadhafi Libya As Good for America

    With Libya descending further into political chaos, voters aren’t sure it was a good idea for the United States to help overthrow the longtime dictator there and definitely don’t want any further U.S. involvement in the troubled North African country.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 19% of Likely U.S. Voters think the changes in Libya over the last three years including the death of dictator Moammar Gadhafi will be good for the United States. Twenty-five percent (25%) believe those changes will be bad for this country, while 29% say they will have no impact. Another 26% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 2-3, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters See Illegal Immigration As Bigger National Security Worry Than Russia, Gaza

    U.S. voters rate the latest immigration crisis as a bigger national security problem for this country than Russia and the renewed fighting between Israelis and Palestinians. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 37% of Likely U.S. Voters, given these three options, consider the growing illegal immigration problem to be a bigger national security concern for the United States. Thirty-one percent (31%) view Russia as the bigger problem. Twenty-three percent (23%) think the situation in Gaza is the bigger danger facing the country. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 29-30, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 54% Believe Obama Wants Most New Illegal Immigrants to Stay

    Voters think President Obama is doing a poor job handling the latest immigration crisis and believe he wants to let most of the new illegal immigrants stay here despite majority support for their quick deportation.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters want the U.S. government to send these new illegal immigrant children home as quickly as possible. Thirty-six percent (36%) think instead that the government should process them more slowly to determine whether any should be allowed to stay in the United States. Ten percent (10%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    This marks a slight increase in favor of quick deportation from earlier this month. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 29-30, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Number of Fiscal Conservatives Up to Highest Level in Past Year

    The number of voters who consider themselves fiscally conservative continues to climb, while one-in-three say they are social liberals.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national survey finds that 44% of Likely U.S. Voters now identify themselves as conservative on fiscal issues such as taxes, government spending and business regulation. That’s up from 41% in April and is the highest finding since last July. Just 14% are liberal in this area, while 37% view themselves as moderates. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 23-24, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.