If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Americans Are Arguing Less This Election Cycle

    Americans may consider this a more divided country than four years ago, but they’re arguing about it a lot less than they were before the 2012 election.

    Twenty percent (20%) of American Adults say they have gotten into a heated argument with a friend of family member about the upcoming election, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. But that compares to 45% in late October 2012. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted on October 22-23, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 54% Think U.S. Society is Fair and Decent

    Voters continue to think American society is generally fair and decent and a large majority maintain that those who immigrate here should adopt the culture.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters think American society is generally fair and decent. This finding is down four points from July and is the lowest finding since July 2007. Prior to 2013, belief that American society was fair and decent regularly ran in the low-to-mid 60s. Thirty-three percent (33%) say American society is generally unfair and discriminatory, up slightly from last month. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on October 9-10, 2014. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Strongly Support Limits on Food Stamp Recipients

    Beginning next year, Indiana will limit how long some can get food stamps, and voters nationwide strongly support similar limits in their state. Just over half favor fixing a deadline for how long people can receive federal public assistance benefits of any kind.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 65% of Likely U.S. Voters favor a program like Indiana’s in their state that would limit access to food stamps to three months for adults without children who do not find work or do not participate in a 20-hour-a-week job training program. Only 24% oppose such limits in their state, while 12% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters nationwide was conducted on October 21-22, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Less Sour Toward Government Work

    A modest plurality of U.S. voters now thinks the best and brightest should work for the government, though most still don’t believe doing so is more honorable than working in the private sector.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 38% of Likely U.S. Voters believe it’s better for America if the best people take government jobs. Thirty-three percent (33%) disagree and think it’s better for the country if those people go to work in the private sector instead. Another 28% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters nationwide was conducted on October 19-20, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Worry ISIS Is Winning in Iraq

    Few voters believe the United States and its allies are winning the war against the radical Islamic State militants, but a strong majority remains confident that ultimate victory is likely.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 15% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the United States and its allies are winning the war in Iraq. Forty-two percent (42%) believe ISIS is winning, while 31% say neither side holds the advantage. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on October 15-16, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 40% Think U.S. Elections Are Fair

    As Election Day nears, voters remain highly skeptical of their elected representatives and the overall electoral process.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 40% of Likely U.S. Voters think American elections are fair to voters, consistent with the findings for the past couple years and down from a high of 57% just before the 2012 presidential election. Forty-two percent (42%) do not believe U.S. elections are fair, although that's down from the mid- to high 40s in surveys since May 2013. The number who considered elections unfair ran mostly in the 30s in surveys for several years prior to that.  Eighteen percent (18%) are now undecided about how fair elections are. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 13-14, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Tea Party Is Still Most Toxic Political Label

    Many pundits have suggested that America is now a 50-50 nation politically, and a look at how voters react to political labels suggests that may be true. Being linked to the Tea Party is still the worst thing you can say about a candidate, but Republicans don’t agree.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that roughly the same number of Likely U.S. Voters consider it a positive description if a candidate is called a conservative (31%), a moderate (33%) or a progressive (30%).

    Twenty-five percent (25%) think it’s a negative description to be called a conservative, while 39% rate it somewhere in between. Slightly more (28%) believe it’s a negative to be called a progressive, the label liberals have adopted to get out from under the “L” word, but 34% say it’s somewhere in between. As for moderate, only 15% view it as a negative description, while 48% see it as somewhere in between positive and negative. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 13-14, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

  • TV's Still Tops for Voters When It Comes to Political News

    Voters still turn to TV over the Internet when it comes to political news, but the gap is narrowing. However, regardless of the source, voters are skeptical about the political news they are getting.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 44% of Likely U.S. Voters are most likely to get their political news from television, while 30% are more likely to use the Internet. Just nine percent (9%) say they usually get their political fix from newspapers or magazines, while seven percent (7%) turn to talk radio. Five percent (5%) get their political news predominately from social media. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 9-10, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say State Electoral Debates Are Important, But Don’t Change Their Mind

    As the midterm election season enters the final stretch, most voters consider debates important to their vote and good indicators of where the candidates stand. But for the majority, a debate has never changed the way they ultimately decided to vote.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 75% of Likely U.S. Voters think that, in terms of how they will vote, debates between candidates for statewide office are at least somewhat important, including 35% who consider them Very Important. Just 23% say such debates are not important to their vote, including six percent (6%) who say they’re Not At All Important. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 11-12, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Say Negative Campaign Ads Have Negative Effect on Voting

    Political candidates produce negative advertisements about their opponents to try to gain more votes, but it turns out that effort has the opposite effect. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 63% of regular television viewers think most political advertising on TV attacks the opposing candidate. Just 14% say most political advertising simply promotes the candidate who is paying for it. Twenty-three percent (23%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on October 8-9, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.