If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Voters Question Ryan’s Motives For Blocking Clinton From Top Secrets

    Voters tend to think House Speaker Paul Ryan is just making a political move with his call to block presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton from receiving intelligence briefings following the FBI's conclusion that she was “extremely careless” with classified information during her time as secretary of State. But voters trust her Republican rival Donald Trump slightly more when it comes to handling the nation's secrets.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 49% of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is more likely Ryan is playing politics rather than genuinely trying to protect the government’s secrets. Thirty-eight percent (38%) disagree and think it's more likely Ryan is honestly looking out for national security. Fourteen percent (14%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 14 and 17, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters to Supreme Court Justices: Shut Up About Politics

    Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg raised eyebrows and even drew fire from her friends at the New York Times for her recent public criticism of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. Voters strongly agree that it’s bad for the high court when the justices make public political statements.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 22% of Likely U.S. Voters think U.S. Supreme Court justices should express their opinions of political candidates in public. Sixty-seven percent (67%) disagree and say public comments like Ginsburg’s raise questions about the impartiality of the high court. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 12-13, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Blacks, Whites Disagree Over Whether There’s A War on Police

    While police killings are escalating in America, voters are less convinced that there is an actual war on those in blue, although most still blame politicians who are critical of the police for making their jobs more dangerous. But blacks and whites sharply disagree on both questions. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 10-11, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Oppose Government-Controlled News Coverage of Candidates

    An effort by two Democrats on the Federal Election Commission to punish Fox News for including additional – but not all - candidates in its first Republican presidential debate failed in a split vote last week. Most voters agree that it’s not up to the government to ensure that the news media treats all candidates equally. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 30 and July 3, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Think Government, Big Business Work Together Against America

    Most voters feel government and big business are a deadly combination.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 68% of Likely U.S. Voters think government and big business often work together in ways that hurt consumers and investors. Seventeen percent (17%) do not, but just as many (15%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 30 and July 3, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Disagree with Decision Not to Indict Clinton

    Most voters disagree with FBI Director James Comey’s decision not to seek a criminal indictment of Hillary Clinton.

    The FBI concluded that Clinton potentially exposed top secret information to hostile countries when she used a private e-mail server as secretary of State, but Comey announced yesterday that the FBI has decided not to pursue a criminal indictment in this matter. A Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey – taken last night - finds that 37% of Likely U.S. Voters agree with the FBI’s decision. But 54% disagree and believe the FBI should have sought a criminal indictment of Clinton. Ten percent (10%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 5, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Aren’t Happy with NAFTA, Other Free Trade Deals

    Donald Trump has vowed to renegotiate NAFTA and other international free trade deals if elected president, saying they are costing U.S. jobs and killing the economy. Supporters say the trade deals lower prices for American consumers. Voters are not big fans of free trade deals like NAFTA but also strongly believe that the politicians negotiating those deals don’t care what they think anyway.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters think the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with Canada and Mexico needs to be renegotiated. Just 27% disagree, but nearly as many (23%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 30 and July 3, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 49% Say Clinton Lied To Victims’ Families About Benghazi Attack

    The final report released this week by the special congressional committee investigating the 2012 terrorist attack in Benghazi, Libya, hasn’t significantly changed voters’ opinions about how the incident will impact Hillary Clinton’s bid for the White House. Still, nearly half of voters believe the then-secretary of State lied to the victims’ families about the nature of the attack. (To survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 28-29, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Here Aren’t Worried About ‘Brexit’

    Despite the media panic and market swings that have resulted, Americans still aren’t sweating Great Britain’s decision to leave the European Union and are not particularly worried that the “Brexit” will hurt them in the pocketbook.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 26% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Great Britain’s decision to quit the EU will hurt their personal finances. But 46% say the “Brexit” will have no impact on them personally, while nine percent (9%) think it will help their personal finances. One-in-five (19%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on June 26-27, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Voters Don't See Love As Answer to Terrorism

    Voters like Attorney General Loretta Lynch a lot more than her predecessor Eric Holder but don’t agree with her that love is the best response to terror incidents like the one in Orlando.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters share a favorable opinion of Lynch, including 27% with a Very Favorable one. Just 27% view the attorney general unfavorably, with 16% who have a Very Unfavorable view of her.  But one-in-five (20%) don’t know enough about the nation’s top law enforcement officer to express any opinion of her. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 22-23, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.