If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Social Media Users Say Sites Don’t Influence Their Politics

    Last Friday, Robert Mueller’s special investigation handed over indictments against 13 Russians for meddling in the 2016 election by using stolen identities from American citizens to promote mostly pro-Trump political activist campaigns through social media. Though most voters are avid users of social media,  few say they’re influenced  by political posts on platforms like Twitter and Facebook.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 71% of Likely U.S. Voters say they use social media like Facebook and Twitter at least a few times a week. That includes 42% who use them every day and 16% who do so nearly every day. Another eight percent (8%) say they go on such sites every now and then. Twenty-one percent (21%) say they rarely or never use social media. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 19-20, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Is POTUS Most Powerful?

    Voters think the president of the United States holds the right amount of power, though they’re not sure if that makes him the most powerful person in the world.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 34% of Likely U.S. Voters think the president of the United States has too much power, while 12% think the president does not have enough power. Nearly half (47%) of voters think the president holds about the right amount of power. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 15 & 18, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Blame Politicians for Federal Deficit

    Voters think it’s important to consider spending cuts across the board to reduce the federal budget, but they think it’s that fault of politicians that nothing is getting cut.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 77% of Likely U.S. Voters think politicians’ unwillingness to reduce government spending is more to blame for the size of the federal deficit than taxpayers’ unwillingness to pay more in taxes. Fourteen percent (14%) think taxpayers are more to blame for the size of the deficit. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 11-12, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 32% Say FBI Director Must Go

    Most voters continue to view the embattled Federal Bureau of Investigation favorably and aren’t ready to fire the FBI’s boss because of its failure to act on warning signs about the Florida school shooter.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 32% of Likely U.S. Voters think FBI Director Christopher Wray should resign or be fired because of the agency’s failure to act on tips alerting them beforehand to the shooter who killed 17 last week. Just over half (52%) disagree, but 16% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on February 19-20, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Support High for Trump's Infrastructure Plan

    President Trump’s plan to fix the nation’s ailing infrastructure calls for generating $1.5 trillion in upgrades through ventures involving the federal government, state government and private industry. Most voters support the proposal, and among those voters, most like the idea of finding outside sources to help fund it.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 65% of Likely U.S. Voters favor Trump’s major plan to improve America’s infrastructure, including highways, bridges and tunnels. Seventeen percent (17%) oppose the plan, while 18% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on February 13-14, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Don’t Trust Government With Their Tax Dollars

    Though Congress and the president continue to introduce bills with increasingly more spending, most voters – including those who want a more hands-on government - don’t trust that taxpayer dollars are being spent wisely.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 10% of Likely U.S. Voters think the government spends taxpayers’ money wisely and carefully, while 81% think they do not. These attitudes have changed little since 2010. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on February 11-12, 2018. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Want Balanced Budget But Know Congress Isn’t Listening

    Congress just passed a bipartisan budget with billions of dollars in new defense and domestic spending. The president has proposed a new budget that would spend even more, projecting deficits long into the future. Most voters think a balanced budget is a better way to go economically, but they don’t foresee that happening anytime soon.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.  

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 13-14, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Democrats Still Credit Obama for U.S. Economic Gains

    Over a year after President Obama left office, a sizable number of voters - including most Democrats - remain convinced that he's responsible for the continuing boom in the U.S. economy.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 42% of all Likely U.S. Voters think the improving economy is due more to the policies Obama put in place than to President Trump. However, 47% disagree and say Trump deserves the credit for the economic turnaround. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.  

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 7-8, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Over Half of Voters Aren’t Cheering for a Military Parade

    President Trump has proposed holding a massive parade in Washington, D.C. to showcase America’s military strength, but most voters don’t want it.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.  

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 11-12, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Wonder Where Conservatives Are in Washington

    Senator Rand Paul stood as a lone dissenting voice late last week as Senate leaders rammed through a bipartisan budget that dramatically increases military and domestic spending. The Kentucky Republican bemoaned the lack of conservatives in power right now, and a lot of voters agree with him.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 42% of Likely U.S. Voters agree with Paul’s statement: “When the Democrats are in power, Republicans appear to be the conservative party. But when Republicans are in power, it seems there is no conservative party.” Thirty-four percent (34%) disagree, but one-in-four voters (23%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on February 11-12, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.