If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Support Grows for States to Ignore the Federal Courts

    Following last week’s controversial U.S. Supreme Court rulings on Obamacare and gay marriage, voters believe more strongly that individual states should have the right to turn their backs on the federal courts.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 33% of Likely U.S. Voters now believe that states should have the right to ignore federal court rulings if their elected officials disagree with them. That’s up nine points from 24% when we first asked this question in February.  Just over half (52%) disagree, down from 58% in the earlier survey. Fifteen percent (15%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 30-July 1, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Supreme Court’s Negatives Jump to All-Time High, but Positives Up, Too

    Negative views of the U.S. Supreme Court are at their highest level in nearly nine years of regular surveying. But positive opinions are also up to a less dramatic three-year high. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 28-29, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Young Voters Are Far Bigger Fans of Gay Marriage Ruling

    A closer look at public attitudes about the recent rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court suggest that it’s largely an age thing. Especially when it comes to gay marriage.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 49% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the Supreme Court’s decision to allow gay marriage in all 50 states. But nearly as many (45%) are opposed, while six percent (6%) remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 28-29, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say WikiLeaks’ Disclosures Put U.S. Relationships At Risk

    The hits just keep on coming. The rogue Internet site WikiLeaks last week released its latest batch of illegally obtained classified U.S. documents, this time showing that America has spied on the last three French presidents. The French government has formally protested, as did the Germans when our spying on Chancellor Angela Merkel was similarly disclosed in 2013. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 24-25, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say No to Government Role in Neighborhood Diversity

    With the Department of Housing and Urban Development ready to release new regulations meant to diversify wealthy neighborhoods, American voters overwhelmingly say that it is not the government’s job to try to bring those of different income levels to live together.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a  free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on June 22-23, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Should South Carolina Take Down The Flag?

    Most voters don’t think the Confederate flag should be flown at the South Carolina Capitol, but they differ when it comes to the flag’s meaning.

    Twenty-one percent (21%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Confederate flag should be flown at South Carolina’s statehouse, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Sixty percent (60%) disagree, while another 18% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters nationwide was conducted on June 22-23, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Black Voters Don’t Think Rachel Dolezal Should Have Resigned From NAACP

    Most voters agree that racial identity should be based on birth, not preference, but black voters are less critical than others of Rachel Dolezal, a white woman who identifies as black who recently resigned from her post at the NAACP. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on June 18 and 21, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Don't Want Big Government, But They Think It's Back

    Nearly 20 years ago, Bill Clinton declared the era of big government over. Two decades later, voters wish that were true.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 18% of Likely U.S. Voters think the era of big government is over, though that’s up from 12% in March  and ties the highest finding last reached in October. Fifty percent (50%) don’t think the big government era is over, though that’s the lowest to date. Thirty-two percent (32%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a  free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 14-15, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Which is Worse: Government With Too Much Power or Not Enough?

    Voters see an overly powerful government as a bigger danger in the world than an under-powered one. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 966 Likely Voters was conducted on June 10-11, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Should the U.S. Constitution Still Be the Nation’s Legal Bedrock?

    Voters may question just how faithful President Obama has been to the U.S. Constitution, but they continue to stand firm in their own belief about the document that has been the supreme law of the United States for 227 years. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 966 Likely Voters was conducted on June 10 and 11, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.