If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • 26% Rate Trump-Russia Allegations Nation’s Biggest Problem

    Despite wall-to-wall media coverage of the Trump-Russia allegations, just one-out-of-four voters rate them as the most serious problem facing the nation. For most voters, economic issues, Obamacare and other problems are more serious.

    When Likely U.S. Voters are asked which of six major problems facing the nation concerns them most, the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 26% opt for the Trump administration’s alleged ties to Russia. Eighteen percent (18%) say the economy is their biggest concern, while 16% list Obamacare. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 16-17, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Few Think Government Has Consent of the Governed

    The Declaration of Independence says that governments derive their authority from the consent of the governed, but only one-in-four voters think the American government today has that consent.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 23% of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal government today has the consent of the governed. Fifty-seven percent (57%) do not, but 20% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on July 16-17, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Sorry, Kid Rock: Voters Still Aren’t Amped Up About Electing Entertainers

    Musician Kid Rock recently announced his intention to run for the U.S. Senate seat in Michigan next year, but despite a celebrity winning the White House, voters aren’t any more likely to say they’d vote for a prominent entertainer.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only seven percent (7%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they would be more likely to vote for a prominent entertainer who runs for public office. Fifty-one percent (51%) say they would be less likely to vote for an entertainer, while 38% say the candidate’s profession and prominence would have no influence on their vote. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 16-17, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Confidence That Congress Will Cut Budget Falls Sharply

    Despite their control of both chambers of Congress, Republicans have been unable to agree on any significant legislation this year and have failed to advance any of President Trump's reform agenda. While voters continue to favor major spending cuts, they are now much less confident than they were earlier in the year that those cuts are coming.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 38% of Likely U.S. Voters still think it’s at least somewhat likely that government spending will be significantly reduced over the next few years, but that's down from 54% who felt that way in March and from 53% in January. Reflecting the confidence voters felt in Trump's budget-cutting agenda with the GOP in control of Congress, the January finding represented a 24-point jump from March of last year. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Republicans Support Government Cuts—But Not Military

    Following a new CBO report on President Trump’s federal budget proposal, most voters still support thoughtful spending cuts in every area of the federal government, but differ across partisan lines over proposals to leave some cuts off the table.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 56% of all Likely U.S. Voters believe thoughtful spending cuts should be considered in every program of the federal government. Thirty-four percent (34%) disagree, while another 10% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Favor Smaller Government Over Larger, More Involved One

    Voters still place preference on a smaller, more hands-off government than on a larger, more hands-on one.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 57% of Likely U.S. Voters would prefer a smaller government with fewer services and lower taxes over a larger, more active government with more services and higher taxes. That’s up from 52% in March, the lowest level in regular surveying since late 2006. This finding is still down from 61% in February of last year,  but is generally more in line with earlier surveys.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on July 12-13, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Should Trump's Foreign Policy Be Like Reagan's or Obama's?

    Following his speech in Poland last week, some are calling President Trump’s remarks touting the values and strengths of the West Ronald Reagan-esque. And half of voters think that’s whose foreign policy Trump should emulate, rather than that of his most recent predecessor.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters prefer a president with a foreign policy more like Reagan. Forty-two percent (42%) prefer a foreign policy more like Barack Obama. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 6 & 9, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Democrats Would Rather Run Congress Than White House

    When it comes to power in Washington, there are two major players: the president and Congress. And most voters, including most Democrats, would rather their political party run the latter.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 53% of all Likely U.S. Voters would prefer to have their party control Congress rather than the White House if given the choice. Thirty percent (30%) would rather have their political party in the White House, but 18% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 6 & 9, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Favor Sending New Terror Suspects to Guantanamo

    The Trump administration is reportedly considering sending new suspected terrorists to the Guantanamo Naval Base prison camp in Cuba, and most voters think that’s a good plan.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey shows that only 29% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the Guantanamo prison established after 9/11 by the George W. Bush administration should be closed. Fifty-three percent (53%) say the facility should not be closed as President Obama unsuccessfully attempted to do. Nineteen percent (19%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 10-11, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • For Voters, Democrat Takeover of House Is A Close Call

    Democrats need to pick up at least 25 new seats to take control of the U.S. House of Representatives in next year's elections, but even after several high-profile losses in special elections this year, Democrats remain confident they can do it. Other voters are not.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 46% of Likely U.S. Voters think it’s at least somewhat likely that Democrats will regain control of the House in next year’s election. Just as many (44%) consider it unlikely. This includes 13% who say a Democratic takeover is Very Likely and 11% who say it’s Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 6 & 9, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.