If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Voters Think U.S. Military Should Put America First

    Voters feel even more strongly that the U.S. military should focus on defending America’s interests rather than addressing the problems of other nations.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey shows that 67% of U.S. Likely Voters believe military strategy should be focused narrowly on defending America and its interests. That's up 12 points from 55% who felt that way in 2011. Only 26% now say the military’s strategy should be the maintenance of worldwide stability and peace, compared to 34% three years ago. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 11-12, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters to Obama, Congress: Work Together!

    Voters are closely divided over whether the upcoming Congress will be better than the one that is now leaving town, but they believe overwhelmingly that President Obama and the new Congress should work together rather than stand on principle.

    Only 13% of Likely U.S. Voters think it is more important for Congress and the president to stand for what they believe in. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 82% feel it is more important for them to work together to achieve what is best for the country. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 15-16, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Want Feds to Cut Spending to Boost Economy

    Americans are still concerned that the government won’t do enough to help the nation’s economy, and most see cutting spending as the necessary fix.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 52% of Likely U.S. Voters worry that in reacting to the nation’s current economic problems, the federal government will not do enough, down slightly from October’s all-time high of 54%. Thirty-seven percent (37%) fear the government will try to do too much, barely up from 36% two months ago, the lowest level of concern since 2011. Eleven percent (11%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 11-12, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters See A Sinking America

    U.S. voters are less bullish on America’s role in the world and see a diminished United States in the decades to come.

    Just 27% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the United States will still be the most powerful nation in the world by the end of the 21st century, down from 37% in January 2009 shortly after the Wall Street meltdown and just before President Obama took office. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 48% disagree and believe the United States will not be the number one world power, a 14-point increase from 34% six years ago. Twenty-four percent (24%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on December 11-12, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Want More Drone Strikes on Terrorists Overseas

    Support for the use of unmanned drone aircraft to kill suspected terrorists overseas is the highest it's been in over two years, but voters still express concern about innocent civilians killed in such attacks.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 71% of Likely U.S. Voters favor the United States’ use of drone aircraft to kill al-Qaeda and Taliban terrorists overseas. That’s up from 63% a year ago but is still down from a high of 76% in February 2012 after President Obama first acknowledged the drone program’s existence.Just 12% oppose the use of drones to kill terrorists in other countries, while 17% remain undecided. (To see survey question wording click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 13-14, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Young People Are Less Likely to See Voting As Catalyst For Change

    A sizable number of Americans feel today’s young people are less politically active than those in previous generations, but it may come down to what adults of different ages see as effective forms of activism.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that a plurality (44%) of American Adults believe young people are less politically active now than they were in previous generations. Eighteen percent (18%) say young adults are more politically active, while 29% say the level of activism is about the same as in prior generations. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

     The national survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted on December 10-11, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Grand Jury Protests: What Are They Good For?

    Most Americans aren’t convinced that recent protests around the country in response to grand jury decisions involving police officers will bring about desired changes and think such protests are controlled by outsiders. But adults who have participated in protests themselves are slightly less skeptical.

    Just 29% of American Adults believe the recent protests following the grand jury decisions in Ferguson, Missouri and on Staten Island, New York, are likely to bring about the changes the protesters are seeking. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 66% say it’s unlikely the protests will bring about desired change. This includes two percent (2%) who say it’s Very Likely such protests will bring about change and 28% who say that’s Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on December 10-11, 2014. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Put Public Safety Ahead of CIA Disclosures

    Voters strongly believe it would have been better for Congress to keep the Central Intelligence Agency’s interrogation methods a secret if the disclosures put the American public at risk.

    Sixty-nine percent (69%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is more important to protect the safety of Americans from terrorist attacks whenever possible than for the public to know the full extent of how the CIA got its information.  A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 23% think it’s more important to publicly disclose the full extent of the CIA’s interrogation methods. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 9-10, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Despite Report, Voters Still See Value in CIA Interrogation Tactics

    On the heels of the Senate’s scathing report on the Central Intelligence Agency’s interrogation practices, nearly half of U.S. voters are in favor of the harsh tactics used and think they elicited valuable information that helped the United States.

    Forty-seven percent (47%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe waterboarding and other aggressive interrogation techniques should be used to gain information from suspected terrorists. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 33% do not think such methods should be used, but another 20% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 9-10, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say Obama Shouldn’t Act on Immigration Without Congress

    Most voters oppose President Obama taking solo action on immigration issues without Congress, perhaps in part because many don’t believe he is as interested as they are in stopping illegal immigration. 

    Fifty-seven percent (57%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal government should only do what the president and Congress agree on when it comes to immigration. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 33% believe the president should take action alone if Congress does not approve the initiatives he has proposed. Ten percent (10%) are undecided. (To see question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 5-6, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.