If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Voters Blame Size of Deficit on Politicians’ Unwillingness to Cut

    Voters want budget cuts, but most also recognize that politicians will be hard to sell on the idea.

    Seventy percent (70%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe the unwillingness of politicians to cut government spending is more to blame for the size of the federal deficit than taxpayer’s unwillingness to pay more in taxes. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 21% see taxpayers’ unwillingness to pay more as the chief problem. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 16 and 19, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most See U.S. Foreign Aid As A Bad Deal for America

    Most voters think the U.S. government gives away too much in foreign aid and that taxpayers aren’t getting their money’s worth.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 57% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the $42.4 billion the U.S. government is slated to give in economic and military aid to other countries this year is too much. Only six percent (6%) say it’s not enough, while 27% rate the level of foreign aid as about right. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 16 and 19, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Now See GOP As Party With A Plan

    Voters have more confidence that Republicans know where they are going.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 45% of Likely U.S. Voters now believe the Republican Party has a plan for the nation. Thirty-eight percent (38%) disagree, while 18% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on March 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Nix Senate Bid for 'The Terminator'

    Arnold Schwarzenegger has refuted reports that he is considering a run for the U.S. Senate, and voters are glad to hear it.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 19% of Likely U.S. Voters think the bodybuilder-turned-actor-turned-California-governor-turned-failed-TV-host should run for the Senate. Fifty-eight percent (58%) do not think the Terminator star should seek a Senate seat, while 22% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on March 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

  • 50% Say New WikiLeaks Disclosure Hurts National Security

    The newest wave of disclosures from the Julian Assange-fronted WikiLeaks shows the sophisticated level of spying the CIA is now capable of, and voters wish they didn’t know.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters think the public disclosure of the CIA’s ability to spy through smart TVs and cell phones hurts national security. But 38% believe this is information the public has a right to know. Thirteen percent (13%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 8-9, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters, Politicians At Odds Over Level of Government Power

    Surprise, surprise: voters don’t think they see eye-to-eye with politicians over of how much power and money the government should have.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that, generally speaking, 66% of voters believe most politicians want the government to have more power and money than it does today. Just 15% think most politicians want it to have less, while 11% think most politicians want the level of government money and power to remain about the same. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a  free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 6-7, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • What to Cut - Defense? Entitlements?

    Voters have long been fans of smaller government and less spending. But Republicans continue to be defensive about cuts in military funding, while Democrats remain loyal to entitlements.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 38% of all Likely U.S. Voters think defense spending should be exempt from spending cuts. Slightly more (42%) say defense spending should remain on the table when it comes to budget cuts. Nineteen percent (19%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 28-March 1, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology

  • Most Don't Want Clinton to Run for Mayor of New York City

    Rumors have been circulating for weeks that Hillary Clinton is eyeing a New York City mayoral run, and the recent appearance of “Hillary for Mayor” signs around the city has added fuel to the fire.

    But 58% of Likely U.S. Voters don’t want to see the failed 2016 Democratic presidential candidate run for mayor of New York City. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 23% think Clinton should seek the mayoralty, while 19% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 2 & 5, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Say New Government Spending Should Be Offset By Budget Cuts

    Most voters continue to expect significant government spending cuts over the next few years and agree that any new spending must be offset by budget cuts elsewhere.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters believe it is likely government spending will be significantly reduced over the next few years. That’s an additional point above the finding in January just before President Trump took office and is a new high in surveys since late 2013. The overall finding includes 24% who say a big spending reduction is Very Likely to happen, showing no change from the previous survey.

    Forty-one percent (41%) continue to feel that government spending is not likely to be reduced significantly over the next few years, but that includes only 14% who say it is Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 28-March 1, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Urge GOP Congress to Go Slow on Trump’s Agenda

    President Trump laid out his agenda in a generally well-received speech Tuesday night to Congress, but most voters don’t want Congress to rush to pass what the president has proposed.

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 28-March 1, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.