If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Only 29% Favor Democratic Probe of Trump If Mueller Finds Nothing

    So far the facts aren’t there, but Democrats remain convinced that the Trump campaign colluded with the Russians to win the presidency. Most voters in general, however, say if Special Counsel Robert Mueller can’t prove it, Democrats should let it go.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 29% of all Likely U.S. Voters think congressional Democrats should do their own investigation if the Mueller probe fails to find proof that the Trump campaign colluded with the Russian government. Sixty-four percent (64%) say Democrats in Congress should move on to other issues instead.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 13-14, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Still See A U.S. Role in NATO

    With the Soviet Union fading further and further into the rearview mirror of history, President Trump has voiced his concern about the cost to the United States of participating in NATO, but most voters here still don’t want to let go of the 70-year-old anti-Soviet alliance.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 58% of Likely U.S. Voters continue to see a need for the United States to belong to the North American Treaty Organization, up from 53% last year. Twenty-three percent (23%) do not. But nearly as many (19%) are unsure about America’s continued participation in the alliance created with its Western European allies in 1949 to prevent the further expansion of the Communist Soviet Union. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 11-12, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Only 40% Think State of the Union Is Strong

    The economy is booming at historic levels, and America’s coming home from war. But voters say that’s not enough to make a strong country and see a need for more economic and social justice.

    Just 40% of Likely U.S. Voters agree with President Trump that “the State of our Union is strong.” The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone and online survey finds that 50% disagree with the Republican president’s statement from last week’s State of the Union Address. Ten percent (10%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 7 and 10, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Not Convinced Tax Increases On Wealthiest Americans Benefit the Economy

    Most voters agree that government spending and taxes are too high, but they’re divided over the impact that raising taxes on the wealthiest Americans would have.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 39% of Likely U.S. Voters think tax increases on the wealthiest Americans will help the economy, while just as many (39%) think it will hurt the economy. Another 14% think tax increases on the wealthy will have no impact on the economy. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 5-6, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Bloomberg vs. Trump, And the Winner Is…

    Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, a centrist Democrat, appears to be contemplating a 2020 presidential run, and he stands a chance against President Trump.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that, if the presidential race in 2020 was between Trump and Bloomberg, 46% of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for Bloomberg, while 40% would vote to reelect Trump. Fourteen percent (14%) are undecided between the two billionaire moguls. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 30-31, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Booker Has A Hill to Climb for Name Recognition

    Like many of the Democratic presidential wannabes, newly declared candidate Cory Booker has a name recognition problem. So voters aren’t giving him much of a chance at this point of going all the way.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that only 30% of Likely U.S. Voters think Booker is likely to end up being the Democratic presidential nominee in 2020, with just six percent (6%) who say it’s Very Likely. Fifty-five percent (55%) say it’s unlikely the U.S. senator from New Jersey and former mayor of Newark will be the nominee, including 24% who say it’s Not At All Likely. But 14% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 3-4, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters See Woman, Person of Color As 2020 Democratic Nominee

    In a year where the Democratic party swore in the most diverse, most female class in history, most voters see that trend continuing all the way to the White House.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 63% of Likely U.S. Voters think it’s at least somewhat likely that the Democratic presidential nominee in 2020 will be a woman or a person of color. Just 24% think that’s unlikely. This includes 23% who say a woman or person of color is Very Likely to win the Democratic presidential nomination and seven percent (7%) who say it’s Not At All Likely. Another 13% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 28-29, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • In A Crowded 2020 Election Field, This Democrat Remains On Top

    Former Vice President Joe Biden remains the favorite candidate among Democrats to be the party’s 2020 presidential nominee. But as support for California Senator Kamala Harris rises, support for Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren is fading.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 39% of Likely Democratic Voters pick Biden first out of a field of six early contenders for the nomination when asked which of them best represents the party and would make the best candidate against President Trump if he runs for reelection in 2020. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 28-29, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Believe Social Media Divides Us

    It may not drive their politics, but most voters believe social media plays a role in dividing us.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 65% of Likely U.S. Voters think social media like Facebook and Twitter make us a more divided nation. Just eight percent (8%) think social media makes us a less divided nation, while 18% think it has no impact on the level of division in our country. Another 10% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 24 & 27, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Mixed on Harris, Don't See Her as 2020 Nominee

    California Senator Kamala Harris has announced her intention to run for president, but voters aren’t paying the California Democrat much heed.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 37% of Likely U.S. Voters have at least a somewhat favorable opinion of Harris, including 16% who view her Very Favorably. Forty percent (40%) view Harris unfavorably, including 27% with a Very Unfavorable opinion of the former San Francisco District Attorney. Another 24% don’t know enough about Harris to offer an opinion. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 28-29, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.