If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

GENERAL POLITICS

  • Voters Say Impeachment Unlikely from Mueller Report Despite Media’s Efforts

    Voters think Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report is unlikely to help congressional Democrats impeach President Trump, but they expect reporters to try to hurt the president with it if they can.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 58% of Likely U.S. Voters say the findings in the Mueller report are unlikely to lead to Trump’s impeachment, with 33% who say it’s Not At All Likely. Thirty-three percent (33%) disagree and say the report is likely to help impeach the president, but that includes only 14% who feel it’s Very Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 22-23, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC.

  • Many Reject Mueller’s Findings But Not Sure Why

    A sizable number of voters don’t agree with the findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report, although many of them are not exactly sure why. Most voters think politics is the reason for the criticism.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that a plurality (47%) of Likely U.S. Voters agrees with Mueller’s conclusion that there was no collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign and no prosecutable obstruction of justice by President Trump. Thirty-nine percent (39%) disagree, while 15% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 18 and 21, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC.

  • Most Would Vote for Gay President, Not So Sure Others Would

    Pete Buttigieg, the little-known Democratic mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is hoping to be the first openly gay presidential nominee of a major party. Most voters are willing to support a gay president, but they’re far less confident that others close to them feel the same way.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 59% of Likely U.S. Voters say they would personally be willing to vote for an openly gay president. Thirty percent (30%) would not, while 12% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 10-11, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC.

  • Many See 9/11 As A Fading Memory

    A Muslim congresswoman has drawn criticism for recent comments that appeared to downplay the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, but voters are closely divided over whether Americans even remember that horrific day. One-in-three can’t say how many died in those attacks.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 39% of Likely U.S. Voters think many Americans have forgotten the impact of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Forty-seven percent (47%) disagree, but 14% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 16-17, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC

  • Most Say It’s Likely Obama, Top Aides Aware of Trump Spying

    Most voters now suspect President Obama or his top people knew that intelligence agencies were spying on the Trump campaign, but they don’t expect anyone to be punished for breaking the law.

    Thirty-six percent (36%) say it’s unlikely Obama or his top aides were aware of the spying, with 18% who say it’s Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 14-15, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Democrats Hot for Trump’s Tax Records, Others A Lot Less So

    Voters still think presidential candidates should make their tax returns public and that President Trump is no exception. But there’s much less interest in those records than there was in 2016, and most voters say their vote next year doesn’t turn on whether Trump’s tax returns are released.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 51% of Likely U.S. Voters believe that all presidential candidates should release their tax returns, but that’s down from 67% in August 2016. Thirty-seven percent (37%) disagree, while 12% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 8-9, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say Media Obsessed with Controversy, Too Quick to Judge

    With charges and countercharges swirling around former Vice President Joe Biden, most voters continue to believe the media is all about controversy and too quick to convict public figures.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 66% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the media in covering most political candidates is more interested in creating controversies about them than in reporting where they stand on the issues. Just 27% think the issues are more important for the media. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 4 and 7, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Are More Suspicious Now of Clinton Collusion

    Now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has ruled out collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russians in 2016, voters, like senior Republicans, are turning a suspicious eye toward Hillary Clinton’s campaign. Most also still suspect high-level wrongdoing at the U.S. Department of Justice.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 47% of Likely U.S. Voters think Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign is more likely than President Trump’s to have illegally colluded with foreign operatives. Nearly as many (45%) still suspect the Trump campaign more. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 27-28, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Political Party Governs Assessment of Media’s Mueller Coverage

    President Trump’s exoneration by the Mueller report has highlighted the highly inaccurate reporting of many major media outlets, but partisan affiliation overrides the facts when it comes to how voters grade the media’s performance.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 33% of Likely U.S. Voters rate the media’s coverage of the Mueller probe and the allegations against Trump and his campaign over the last two years as good or excellent. But 40% view that coverage as poor. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 25-26, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 61% Nix Congressional Democratic Probe of Trump After Mueller

    Now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has finished his investigation of the Trump campaign’s alleged collusion with Russia, most voters say enough is enough. But many Democrats want to keep on going.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 31% of all Likely U.S. Voters think congressional Democrats should do their own investigation even though the Mueller probe has failed to prove that the Trump campaign colluded with the Russian government. Sixty-one percent (61%) say Democrats in Congress should move on to other issues. This compares to 29% and 64% respectively in mid-February.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 25-26, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.