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ELECTIONS

  • Voters See Debate Moderators Giving Clinton A Helping Hand

    Voters are pretty convinced the moderators at the presidential debates scheduled to begin tonight will be helping Hillary Clinton more than Donald Trump.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that a plurality (46%) of Likely U.S. Voters believes most moderators will try to help Clinton in the upcoming debates. Only six percent (6%) think they will try to help Trump instead. Just 32% say most of the moderators will try to be unbiased, while 15% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 20-21, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes  and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • Voters Say Debates More Important This Year

    The first televised debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is set for Monday evening, and voters - particularly those within the two major parties - place more importance on the debates this election cycle than they have in past years. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 20-21, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes  and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • Republicans Couldn’t Care Less About Bush's Vote For Clinton

    Former President George H.W. Bush who along with the rest of his family boycotted July's Republican National Convention was outed on social media this week as planning to vote for Hillary Clinton. Bush has not confirmed his vote to the media, but his reported decision has little impact on voters, especially his fellow Republicans.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 77% of Likely Republican Voters say Bush's decision to vote for Clinton will have no impact on their voting decision. Thirteen percent (13%), in fact, say they are less likely to vote for Clinton now versus seven percent (7%) who are more likely to vote for her because of Bush's choice. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 20-21, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • White House Watch: Trump 44%, Clinton 39%, Johnson 8%, Stein 2%

    With the first presidential debate coming on Monday, Donald Trump has moved to a five-point lead over Hillary Clinton, his biggest advantage since mid-July.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports weekly White House Watch telephone and online survey finds Trump with 44% support among Likely U.S. Voters to Clinton’s 39%. Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson earns eight percent (8%) of the vote, while Green Party nominee Jill Stein holds steady at two percent (2%). Three percent (3%) like some other candidate, and five percent (5%) are still undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 20-21, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Nevada Senate: Heck (R) 44%, Cortez Masto (D) 40%

    Republican Joe Heck has pulled slightly further ahead of Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto in the race to replace retiring U.S. Senator Harry Reid in Nevada.

    A KTNV-TV 13 Action News/Rasmussen Reports telephone and online survey of Likely Nevada Voters shows Heck with 44% support to Cortez Masto’s 40%. The two were nearly even in late July just after the Democratic National Convention. Heck held a 46% to 37% lead in our first look at the race earlier that month.  Now  six percent (6%) prefer some other candidate, while 11% remain undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters in Nevada was conducted on September 16-18, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Nevada: Trump 42%, Clinton 39%, Johnson 11%

    The race remains tight in Nevada, but Donald Trump has once again edged into the lead. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 800 Likely Voters in Nevada was conducted on September 16-18, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Which Democrat Should Replace Hillary?

    Suppose the unthinkable took place, and Hillary Clinton was forced for health reasons to step down as the Democratic presidential nominee. Who do Democrats think should take her place?

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 48% of Likely Democratic Voters believe Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, Clinton’s primary rival, should be their party’s nominee if health issues forced her out of the race. Twenty-two percent (22%) say Vice President Joe Biden should be the nominee, while only 14% opt for Virginia Senator Tim Kaine, the current Democratic vice presidential candidate. Nine percent (9%) of Democrats think it should be someone else. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 14-15, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes  and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • Most Reject Online Voting, See Higher Risk of Fraud

    The Obama administration has expressed alarm about dangers to our election system from foreign hackers, and online voting is seen as perhaps the most vulnerable to attack. Most voters still don’t like the idea of voting via the internet and think it’s easier to corrupt than other voting methods.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 29% of Likely U.S. Voters favor allowing voters to vote online in the area where they live. Fifty-nine percent (59%) are opposed to online voting, while 12% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 12-13, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Clinton’s Health Is Just Another Partisan Issue

    Democrats aren’t worried about Hillary Clinton’s health, but most other voters feel she may not be physically up to the job.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters are concerned about Clinton’s health if she wins the 2016 presidential election. Forty-nine percent (49%) don’t share that concern. This includes 35% who are Very Concerned about the state of Clinton’s health and 27% who are Not At All Concerned. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 12-13, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes  and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • More Voters Than Ever Say Politicians Make False Promises To Get Elected

    An overwhelming majority of voters continues to believe politicians don’t keep their campaign promises and are even more convinced it’s because they’ll say whatever it takes to get elected. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 8 and 11, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.