If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

ELECTIONS

  • Do Democrats Still Expect Obama To Endorse Hillary?

    Voters still think President Obama and Hillary Clinton agree on most things, but they’re not as confident as they were a year ago that the president’s going to endorse Clinton to be the next Democratic presidential nominee.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 58% of Likely U.S. Voters think Clinton and Obama hold similar views on most major policy issues. That’s up from 52% a year ago when we first asked this question. Nineteen percent (19%) say they don’t agree on most issues, while 23% are not sure.(To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 27 and 30, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Trump Change: ‘The Donald’ Edges Higher

    This week, Donald Trump made headlines with a political rally in a football stadium and his televised confrontation with Univision activist/commentator Jorge Ramos. Rasmussen Reports’ latest Trump Change survey shows belief that Trump will be the next Republican presidential nominee inching up among both GOP voters and voters in general.

    A new national telephone survey finds that 59% of Likely Republican Voters now believe Trump is likely to be their party’s nominee for president in 2016, up barely from 57% a week ago.  But the latest finding includes 29% who say a Trump nomination is Very Likely, a view shared last week by just 25%. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on August 25-26, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Are Democrats Ready for Elizabeth Warren to Run?

    Politically, she’s Bernie Sanders with charisma. Now, with Hillary Clinton’s legal troubles, do Democrats want Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren to reconsider and jump into their party’s presidential race?

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 30% of Likely Democratic Voters think Warren should run for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016. Forty-five percent (45%) say she shouldn’t run, but one-in-four Democrats (25%) is undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 23-24, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Sanders Gains Big As Clinton Falls

    Hillary Clinton's numbers continue to fall, while support for Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has surged significantly in Rasmussen Reports' latest look at the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.

    Our latest national telephone survey finds that 50% of Likely Democratic Primary Voters still say they would vote for Clinton if their party's state primary was held today, but that’s down nine points from January and 12 points from last November.  Twenty-four percent (24%) now prefer Sanders who had only four percent (4%) support nine months ago.

    The remaining announced candidates - former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, former Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee and former Virginia Senator Jim Webb - each earn just two percent (2%) of the vote from Democratic primary voters. Ten percent (10%) prefer some other candidate, while another 10% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports Managing Editor Fran Coombs or spokesman Leon Sculti are available for media comment on these poll results. Call 732-776-9777x205 or send e-mail to leon.sculti@rasmussenreports.com to schedule now.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 536 Likely Democratic Primary Voters was conducted on August 23-24, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Should Hillary Clinton Suspend Her Campaign?

    Growing national security questions about Hillary Clinton’s use of a private e-mail server during her time as secretary of State are drowning out much of her message as a presidential candidate and causing many of her fellow Democrats to worry about the future of her campaign. Is it time for Clinton to put her campaign on temporary hold?

    Voters are almost evenly divided on that question: the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 46% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Clinton should suspend her campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination until all of the legal questions about her use of the private e-mail server are resolved. Nearly as many (44%) disagree. Nine percent (9%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports Managing Editor Fran Coombs or spokesman Leon Sculti are available for media comment on these poll results. Call 732-776-9777x205 or send e-mail to leon.sculti@rasmussenreports.com to schedule now.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 23-24, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Hillary Meter Drops Dramatically

    In the face of increasing legal questions about the safety of secrets on the private e-mail server she used as secretary of State and of a vigorous intraparty challenge from Bernie Sanders, belief that Hillary Clinton is likely to be next year's Democratic presidential nominee has dropped noticeably over the past month. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 13 and 16, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • GOP Voters On Gilmore: Jim Who?

    Former Virginia Governor Jim Gilmore quietly entered the crowded race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination in late July, but GOP voters see little chance that he will be the nominee.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 12% of Likely Republican Voters think Gilmore is at least somewhat likely to end up being the GOP nominee next year, including three percent (3%) who say it’s Very Likely. Sixty-eight percent (68%) consider a Gilmore nomination unlikely, with 45% who feel it’s Not At All Likely. But 20% are not sure (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on August 9-10, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Should Democrats Have More Debates?

    Democrats are planning to hold six debates for their 2016 presidential candidates, but at least two of the candidates – Bernie Sanders and Martin O’Malley - say that’s not enough.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 9-10, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Carly Up, Trump Down

    The post-debate picture has a new contender in the top 10 of Republican presidential contenders, while the leader of the pack has taken a fall.

    New Rasmussen Reports polling finds that Carly Fiorina, stuck in the bottom tier of debaters last Thursday, has now jumped to nine percent (9%) support among Likely Republican Primary Voters. That’s up from one percent (1%) in late July before the debates  and puts the former Hewlett-Packard CEO in a virtual tie with Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush and Scott Walker after her impressive debate performance last week.

    At the same time, Donald Trump’s level of support has dropped from 26% before the debate to 17% now. He still leads the 17-person GOP presidential field but not by nearly as much. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 651 Likely Republican Primary Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on August 9-10, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Has ‘The Donald’ Peaked?

    Donald Trump remains the leader in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, but his support has fallen by a third over the past week-and-a-half. Carly Fiorina is now near the front of the pack.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds Trump with 17% support among Likely Republican Primary Voters, down from 26% in late July before the first GOP debate.  Senator Marco Rubio and former Florida Governor Jeb Bush are in second place with 10% support each, in a near tie with Fiorina and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker who both earn nine percent (9%) of the likely primary vote.

    Next with eight percent (8%) come retired neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson and Senator Ted Cruz at seven percent (7%). (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports Managing Editor Fran Coombs and spokesman Leon Sculti are available for media comment on these poll results. Call 732-776-9777x205 or send an e-mail to leon.sculti@rasmussenreports.com to schedule now.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 651 Likely Republican Primary Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on August 9-10, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.