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ELECTIONS

  • GOP Voters Agree With Romney on Need for A New Face

    Republican voters agree with Mitt Romney that their party should look for someone new to run in 2016.

    In announcing his decision today not to seek the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, Romney said:  “I believe that one of our next generation of Republican leaders, one who may not be as well known as I am today, one who has not yet taken their message across the country, one who is just getting started, may well emerge as being better able to defeat the Democrat nominee. In fact, I expect and hope that to be the case.”

  • Do Democratic Voters Like Their Party Leaders?

    Democratic voters have their complaints with Washington, D.C., but they remain more content with their party’s political representation than Republican voters are.

    Here are some findings from a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey of Likely Democratic Voters:

    -- Forty-six percent (46%) believe Democrats in Congress have done a good job representing Democratic values over the past several years. By comparison, just 24% of Republican voters think their representatives have done a good job upholding party values. But now 42% of Democrats think their legislators have lost touch with Democratic voters throughout the nation, up from 33% last September. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 648 Likely Democratic Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Are GOP Voters to the Right of Their Representatives in Congress?

    Republicans are definitely a conservative bunch. Consider these findings from a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey of Likely Republican Voters:

    -- Sixty percent (60%) want to repeal the national health care law and start over, compared to 30% of all voters.  Only 34% of Republicans want to go through the law piece by piece to improve it.

    -- Just 13% think Congress should take no action to stop President Obama’s executive order protecting up to five million illegal immigrants from deportation. Eighty-two percent (82%) of Republicans say Congress should find ways to stop it. Among all voters, 43% want to let the president’s action stand, while 48% want Congress to stop it.

    -- Eighty-three percent (83%) of GOP voters agree with the late Ronald Reagan that big government is the problem, not the solution. Just seven percent (7%) say it’s the solution instead.

    -- Is America overtaxed? Eighty-two percent (82%) of Republicans think so. Only 11% disagree. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 787 Likely Republican Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Hillary’s Still The One for Most Democrats

    The race to be the Democratic Party’s 2016 presidential nominee is still Hillary Clinton’s to lose.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey asked Likely Democratic Voters to choose among six of the early presidential hopefuls from their party as if their state primary were held right now. Clinton remains far and away the leader with 59% support. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is in second place, but she earns just 12% of the vote.

    The remaining four candidates each get single-digit support: Vice President Joe Biden (6%), Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders (4%), former Virginia Senator Jim Webb (3%) and former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley (2%). Five percent (5%) like some other candidate, and nine percent (9%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 648 Likely Democratic Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Clinton vs. Warren, and the Winner Among Democrats Is…

    Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is increasingly the favorite of left-leaning Democrats, but Hillary Clinton trounces her in a head-to-head matchup for their party’s 2016 presidential nomination. One-in-five Democratic voters, however, say they’ve never heard of Warren at this early stage of the game.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that Clinton beats Warren 62% to 22% among Likely Democratic Voters asked whom they would vote for if their state’s primary was held today. But 16% are undecided given those two choices only. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 648 Likely Democratic Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Romney Leads the GOP Pack – For Now

    Generally, at this stage of the game, it’s mostly about name recognition, and Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential nominee in 2012, is the leader in the race to be the party’s standard-bearer in 2016.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey asked Likely Republican Voters to choose among nine of the early Republican wannabes if their state primary were held right now, and Romney earns 24% support. Three candidates are closely grouped together for second place: former Florida Governor Jeb Bush at 13%, retired neurosurgeon and conservative columnist Ben Carson with 12% of the vote and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker at 11%.

    Earning single-digit support are Kentucky Senator Rand Paul (7%), New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (7%), Florida Senator Marco Rubio (5%) and former Texas Governor Rick Perry (5%). Four percent (4%) of GOP voters like some other candidate, and 12% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 787 Likely Republican Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Bush vs. Romney, and the Winner Among GOP Voters Is…

    For most voters, it’s the battle of the best-known last names on the Republican side. For many GOP voters, it’s the battle of the moderates seeking the party’s 2016 presidential nomination. Call it what you will: Right now, Mitt Romney holds a double-digit lead over Jeb Bush in a head-to-head matchup.

    If the 2016 Republican presidential primary were held in their state right now and Romney and Bush were the only names on the ballot, 49% of Likely Republican Voters would choose the party’s 2012 presidential nominee, while 32% would opt instead for the former Florida governor. But a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that a sizable 19% are undecided given only these two candidates to choose from. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 787 Likely Republican Voters was conducted on January 18-19, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Think GOP Needs A Fresh Face in 2016

    Most voters – including Republicans – think the GOP should start fresh during the next presidential election. But a sizable number of voters also express concern about families from both sides of the political aisle holding too much influence.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 64% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Republicans should look for a fresh face to run for president in 2016. Just 10% think the GOP should promote a candidate who has run in the past. Twenty-five percent (25%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 28, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Republicans Aren't Thrilled by Another Bush Candidacy

    GOP voters aren’t enthused about Jeb Bush running for president in 2016 and feel even more strongly that his family’s history in the White House makes him a less attractive candidate to vote for.

    Just 33% of Likely Republican Voters nationwide believe Bush should run for president in 2016, according to a new Rasmussen Reports telephone survey. Just as many (34%) disagree, while another 33% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on December 28, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Louisiana Senate Runoff: Cassidy (R) 56%, Landrieu (D) 40%

    Republican Congressman Bill Cassidy still holds a double-digit lead over incumbent Democrat Mary Landrieu going into tomorrow’s Louisiana Senate runoff.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports statewide telephone survey of Likely Louisiana Voters shows Cassidy leading Landrieu by 16 points – 56% to 40%. Four percent (4%) are still undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters in Louisiana was conducted on December 2-4, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.