If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

ELECTIONS

  • Will A Republican Be the Next President?

    There’s still a ways to go before Election Day 2016, but most voters – especially Republicans – think a GOP victory is likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 5-6, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Give Huckabee Best Shot at Nomination of This Week’s GOP Newcomers

    Republicans think Mike Huckabee has the best chance of getting the GOP presidential nomination of the three new contenders in the race this week, but then he’s the best-known of the trio.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 48% of Likely Republican Voters believe Huckabee is likely to end up being the GOP presidential nominee in 2016, but that includes only 11% who say it is Very Likely. Forty percent (40%) consider a Huckabee nomination unlikely, with 11% who also say it’s Not At All Likely. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 5-6, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • Note to 2016 Hopefuls: Don't Call Yourself a Socialist or Career Politician

    The 2016 presidential race has its first self-described socialist candidate now that longtime Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is running for the Democratic nomination, but most voters see this political label as toxic.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 13% of Likely U.S. Voters would consider it a positive if a political candidate were described as being a socialist. But that's up from eight percent (8%) four years ago. A majority (53%) still sees the socialist label as a negative, down from 58% in the earlier survey, while 28% view it as somewhere in between. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 3-4, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • A Tale of Two Pollsters

    The New York Times reports in their latest poll released late yesterday that Americans don’t care about Hillary Clinton’s e-mail and Clinton Foundation problems. They conclude that the former secretary of State and putative Democratic presidential nominee in 2016 has weathered the storm so far.

    For Democrats, it’s always advantageous when pollsters turn to Americans in general or even registered voters rather than Likely Voters like those we routinely survey here at Rasmussen Reports. It’s true that Republicans are more likely than Democrats to say they intend to vote which helps explain why Democrats are always championing schemes like same-day voter registration, mail-in voting and the like to get their voters to the polls. But, historically, we’ve also found that polling likely voters gets us closer to the actual end result than surveying Americans as a whole.

  • Will Bernie Sanders Be the Democratic Nominee in 2016?

    Bernie Sanders has some work to do if he wants to be the next Democratic nominee for president of the United States. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 3-4, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Will Bill Help or Hurt Hillary in 2016?

    Voters are less convinced that Bill Clinton will be a plus for his wife’s bid for the White House.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 46% of Likely U.S. Voters think the former president will help Hillary Clinton’s run next year. That’s down from 54% a year ago. Twenty-one percent (21%) now think he will hurt her candidacy, up eight points from last year, while just has many (22%) say he’ll have no impact. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 13-14, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • Rubio for President?

    Senator Marco Rubio is the third Republican to officially announce his candidacy for president, and GOP voters think he has about the same shot as his announced rivals to win the party’s nomination. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 13-14, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 57% Think Hillary Clinton Likely To Win in 2016

    Most voters think Hillary Clinton will be the next president of the United States even though they have very mixed feelings about her. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 13-14, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Clinton vs. Cruz, Clinton vs. Paul

    Hillary Clinton, now officially a candidate for president in 2016, leads the first two announced candidates for the Republican nomination but earns less than 50% support at this early stage. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 9 & 12, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • How Do GOP Voters Rate Rand Paul’s Chances?

    Republican voters rate Rand Paul’s chances of getting the GOP presidential nomination as about the same as Ted Cruz’s at this early stage of the game. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    [Have we heard from you yet? The 2015 Rasmussen Reports reader survey is the most important poll we’ll take all year. Take the survey now.]  

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 7-8, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.