If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

ELECTIONS

  • How Big a Third-Party Threat Is Trump?

    If “The Donald” loses the Republican presidential nomination and runs as a third-party candidate, he definitely could put a crimp in GOP hopes to reclaim the White House. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports Rasmussen Reports Managing Editor Fran Coombs or spokesman Leon Sculti are available for media comment on these poll results. Call 732-776-9777x205 or send e-mail toleon.sculti@rasmussenreports.com to schedule now.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 28-29, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Trump Is Well Ahead As First Debate Looms

    Going into the first Republican debate of the primary season next week, it looks like Donald Trump, Scott Walker and Jeb Bush are guaranteed seats.

    They’re the three leaders in Rasmussen Reports' first national survey of Likely Republican Voters. After that, it gets a lot murkier. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports spokesman Leon Sculti is available for media comment on these poll results. Call 732-776-9777x205 or send e-mail to leon.sculti@rasmussenreports.com to schedule now.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 471 Likely Republican Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on July 26-27, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • GOP Voters Say Kasich’s Not A Contender Yet

    Who? That seems to be Ohio Governor John Kasich’s biggest problem as perhaps the last major entrant in the race for next year’s Republican presidential nomination.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 44% of Likely Republican Voters – and 50% of all Likely Voters – don’t know enough about Kasich to have any kind of opinion of him. At this stage of a campaign, name recognition is most everything.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of GOP voters view Kasich favorably, while 21% share an unfavorable opinion of him. This includes 12% who regard him Very Favorably and eight percent (8%) with a Very Unfavorable view.(To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 20-21, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Meet the Hillary Meter

    Just over 10 years ago when Hillary Clinton first took aim at the presidency, Rasmussen Reports introduced the Hillary Meter to regularly update public perceptions of the former first lady on her long march to the White House. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 14 and 15, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Walker for President?

    Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has long been considered one of the more formidable contenders for next year’s Republican presidential nomination, but do GOP voters agree now that he’s formally entered the race? (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 14-15, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Bush Says Americans Need to Work Harder, But Do They Agree?

    Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush caused a stir on the campaign trail last week when he said Americans need to work harder to get the U.S. economy back on its feet. But most voters disagree and feel strongly instead that government and special interests have gamed the economy to deny Americans what they are due.

    Rasmussen Reports tested Bush’s comments and the responses by Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton’s campaign and by another Republican presidential hopeful, Senator Ted Cruz of Texas, and this is what voters told us. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 12-13, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Do Voters Want to See Candidate Tax Returns?

    Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush recently released 33 years of tax returns to the public. Voters want his opponents to follow suit, although most don’t need them to go back as far as Bush did. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 2 and 5, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Do Democrats Think Webb Has A Shot?

    Former U.S. Senator from Virginia Jim Webb quietly entered the race for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination last week, but voters in his party consider him a longshot.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 19% of Likely Democratic Voters think Webb, who served in the Senate until 2013, is even somewhat likely to be their party’s nominee in 2016, and that includes only four percent (4%) who say it is Very Likely. Sixty-two percent (62%) think a Webb nomination is unlikely, including 31% who think it’s Not At All Likely to happen. Nineteen percent (19%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 2 and 5, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Clinton Still Far Outpaces Her Democratic Rivals

    Despite the increasing media coverage going to some of her rivals for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, Hillary Clinton remains hugely ahead as far as the party’s voters are concerned.

    Ninety-three percent (93%) of Likely Democratic Voters believe Clinton is likely to end up being their party’s nominee next year, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. That includes 60% who say it is Very Likely. Just five percent (5%) disagree, with only one percent (1%) who think a Clinton nomination is Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 2 and 5, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Where Does Christie Stand With GOP Voters?

    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, once considered a formidable contender for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, tracks in the lower tier of GOP hopefuls now that he has made his candidacy official.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 24% of Likely Republican Voters think Christie is likely to end up being the GOP presidential nominee next year. That includes only six percent (6%) who say it is Very Likely. Sixty-three percent (63%) say Christie is unlikely to be the nominee, including 25% who feel it is Not At All Likely. Thirteen percent (13%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on June 30 – July 1, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.