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ELECTIONS

  • White House Watch: Clinton 42%, Trump 38%, Johnson 9%, Stein 2%

    The e-mail scandal and new accusations about the Clinton Foundation may be bedeviling Hillary Clinton, but Donald Trump appears unable to capitalize on them.

    The latest weekly Rasmussen Reports White House Watch shows Trump losing ground: Clinton now holds a 42% to 38% lead among Likely U.S. Voters, up slightly from the 41% to 39% advantage she held a week ago.

    In the latest survey, Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson again captures nine percent (9%) of the vote, while Green Party candidate Jill Stein picks up two percent (2%) support. Three percent (3%) like some other candidate, and seven percent (7%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 23-24, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes  and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • Voters Say It’s Important for Clinton, Trump to Hold Press Conferences

    Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton hasn’t had a formal press conference since late last year, largely avoiding media questions for the entire primary season. Republican nominee Donald Trump’s routine press conferences often seem to do him more harm than good. Do voters want presidential candidates to meet the press? 

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 82% of Likely U.S. Voters think it is important for the major presidential candidates to hold regular press conferences to answer questions from reporters, with 48% who say it is Very Important. Just 17% view regular press conferences as unimportant, and that includes only three percent (3%) who feel they are Not At All Important. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 15-16, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Is Trump to Blame for His Bad Media Coverage?

    Most voters still think the media is more interested in controversy than in the issues when it comes to the presidential race, and supporters of Donald Trump strongly believe the coverage of his public comments is a classic example. Most Hillary Clinton supporters say Trump’s just a sloppy speaker. 

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 74% of Likely U.S. Voters believe that in covering presidential candidates the media is more interested in creating controversies about them than in reporting where they stand on the issues. Just 20% think the media is more interested in covering where the candidates stand on the issues. (To see survey question wording, click here.) 

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 15-16, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Still Don’t Trust Clinton or Trump

    Democrats trust Hillary Clinton more than Republicans trust Donald Trump, but most unaffiliated voters don’t trust either one of them.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 11 and 14, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes  and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • Voters See Trump As His Own Worst Enemy

    Wall Street Journal columnist Peggy Noonan wrote earlier this year that the only person who can beat Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump is Trump himself, and so far voters think that's exactly what he's doing.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 45% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Trump’s biggest political enemy this election cycle is himself. Just 29% say his biggest foe is Hillary Clinton and the Democratic party, while 20% say it's the national media. Despite Trump's tense relations with his party’s traditional leadership, just five percent (5%) think other Republicans are his biggest enemy. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 7-8, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes  and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • GOPers Favor Ryan’s Reelection But Think Party Should Be More Like Trump

    Republicans still prefer a party that’s more like Donald Trump but hope nevertheless that House Speaker Paul Ryan defeats his anti-establishment opponent in today’s Wisconsin GOP primary. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 7-8, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    [Rasmussen Reports analysts Amy Holmes and Fran Coombs are available for interested media. Please call 732-776-9777 ext. 205 for interviews.]

  • Pence vs. Kaine, and the Winner Is …

    If the presidential contest suddenly boiled down to a battle between the two vice presidential candidates, Republicans have the edge.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 3-4, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Democrats, Republicans Driven By Different Issues This Election

    The economy remains the number one issue for all voters this election cycle, but Republicans are a lot more worried about national security than Democrats and unaffiliated voters are.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 37% of all Likely U.S. Voters say the economy and jobs is the most important issues to their vote for president this fall. Twenty-nine percent (29%) see national security and the War on Terror as most important. Illegal immigration comes in a distant third with 12% support, while eight percent (8%) see the environment as most important. Five percent (5%) consider race and gender policy to be the most important election issue, but seven percent (7%) place the most importance on something else not named in the survey. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter and Facebook.

    The surveys of 1,000 Likely Voters each were conducted on August 1-2, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error for each survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • If Trump’s ‘Unfit to Serve,’ What About Clinton?

    President Obama earlier this week denounced Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump as “unfit to serve” and “woefully unprepared to do this job.” Nearly half of voters agree, but they’re not so sure about Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton either.

    Rasmussen Reports in a national telephone and online survey told Likely U.S. Voters that a major public figure had criticized one of the two major party presidential candidates this way and asked them which of the two this best describes.  Forty-eight percent (48%) say Trump, while 37% feel it best describes Clinton. Twelve percent (12%) say it applies to both candidates; two percent (2%) say neither. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 3-4, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Nevada Senate: Heck (R) 42%, Cortez Masto (D) 41%

    The race to replace retiring U.S. Senator Harry Reid in Nevada has tightened up over the past week.

    A KTNV-TV 13 Action News/Rasmussen Reports telephone and online survey of Likely Nevada Voters finds Republican Joe Heck with 42% support to Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto’s 41%. In our first survey of the race last week, Heck held a much wider 46% to 37% lead. At this early stage, however, 17% of voters are still in play: six percent (6%) prefer some other candidate, and 11% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 750 Likely Voters in Nevada was conducted on July 22-24, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.