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ELECTIONS

  • Final Trump Change: ‘The Donald' Is A Done Deal

    Rasmussen Reports’ final weekly Trump Change survey finds perceptions among Republicans and all voters that Donald Trump is the likely GOP presidential nominee at all time highs. The survey was begun before Ted Cruz and John Kasich quit the race. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on May 3-4, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Candidates Should Think Twice Before Endorsing Trump or Clinton

    Right now as other candidates consider whether to fall in line behind their party’s presumptive standard-bearer, it’s a curse more than a blessing to endorse Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 40% of Likely U.S. Voters are less likely to vote for any candidate who endorses Clinton, the likely Democratic presidential nominee. Just 26% are more likely to vote for that candidate, while 32% say a Clinton endorsement would have no impact on their voting decision. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 3-4, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most GOPers Say Cruz, Kasich Should Quit; Dems Not So Eager to Lose Sanders

    Even before the votes are counted in today’s Indiana primaries, most Republicans think Ted Cruz and John Kasich should quit the race for their party’s presidential nomination. Democrats, on the other hand, aren’t so eager for Bernie Sanders to drop out.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 39% of Likely Republican Voters believe Cruz should remain in the race. Fifty-two percent (52%) say the Texas senator should quit the contest for the GOP nomination. Just five percent (5%) say he should run as a third-party candidate. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 27-28, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Trump 41%, Clinton 39%

    Last week, Rasmussen Reports gave voters the option of staying home on Election Day if Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are the big party nominees, and six percent (6%) said that’s what they intend to do for now. Clinton and Trump were tied with 38% support each; 16% said they would vote for some other candidate, and two percent (2%) were undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 27-28, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Trump 38%, Clinton 38%

    Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are again tied up in a head-to-head matchup.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey of Likely U.S. Voters finds Trump and Clinton each earning 38% support. Sixteen percent (16%) say they will vote for some other candidate if they are the two major party candidates, while six percent (6%) plan to stay home. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 25-26, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • 24% Opt Out of a Clinton-Trump Race

    Nearly one-in-four voters say they will stay home or vote third party if Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are the major party presidential candidates. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 25-26, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • OK, Republicans – Trump or Clinton?

    It’s moment of truth time for the #Never Trump crowd: Do you want four years of Hillary Clinton in the White House or a Republican president you strongly disagree with?

    The Bernie Sanders revolution is over. More than 90% of Democrats already see Clinton as their likely nominee, and her big wins in yesterday’s primaries are sure to push that number to near absolute certainty.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

  • Voters See Growing Divide Between Voters, Party Leaders

    The surprising level of support for Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders suggests voters in the two major parties are getting more extreme in their thinking than their respective party leaders. A sizable number of voters agree, though Democrats are more likely than Republicans to think their party’s voters and leaders are in sync.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that a plurality (44%) of Democrats feels the political attitudes of the party’s voters match up with those of the party leaders. This compares to just 27% of Republican voters who say that of their own party. Nearly half (46%) of Republicans think GOP voters are moving to the right of their party leaders. Forty percent (40%) of Democrats say their party’s voters are becoming more liberal than their leadership.

    Twenty-four percent (24%) of Republicans say their fellow voters are moving to the left of the GOP leadership, but only half as many Democrats (12%) see voters in their party as becoming more conservative. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 17-18, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Hillary Meter: Primary Losses Don’t Break Clinton’s Momentum

    Despite losing seven straight state primaries to Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders in the past month, Hillary Clinton is seen by more voters than ever as the eventual Democratic nominee.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports monthly Hillary Meter finds that 91% of Likely Democratic Voters think Clinton is likely to be their party’s presidential nominee in 2016. This includes 62% who say it is Very Likely, up just a point from last month but still the highest number of Democrats who consider Clinton’s nomination Very Likely in monthly surveys since July.  Just eight percent (8%) now feel the former secretary of State is not very or Not At All Likely to win the nomination. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 13-14, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Republicans Say Kasich, Cruz Ready to Be President, Not Trump

    Most Republicans think Texas Senator Ted Cruz and Ohio Governor John Kasich have what it takes to be president, but GOP voters are evenly divided over whether the same is true of Donald Trump. Among all voters, however, only Kasich fills the bill.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Kasich is qualified to be president of the United States. But just 40% feel that way about Cruz, and only 27% think Trump, the GOP presidential front-runner, is ready for the job.

    By comparison, 50% think Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton is qualified to be president, and 48% say her rival Bernie Sanders is, too.

    Sixty-six percent (66%) say the billionaire businessman is not qualified for the White House, while 43% say the same of Cruz. Thirty percent (30%) say Kasich is not qualified enough. Most voters definitely have opinions about Trump, but 18% and 16% respectively are undecided about Cruz’s and Kasich’s qualifications. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on April 7 and 10, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.