If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

HEALTHCARE

  • Voters Still See Dismal Future For Health Care System

    Voters are less satisfied with the health care they personally receive and remain pessimistic that the national health care law will make the system any better.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 67% of Likely U.S. Voters still rate the quality of the health care they receive as good or excellent. Still, that’s down from 70% in April  and is the lowest finding in nearly two-and-a-half years of regular surveying  . These positives have generally run in the high 70s and low 80s for most of this period but have been trending down since the first of the year.

    Only seven percent (7%), however, rate the care they get as poor, just slightly above findings for much of the past two years. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 19-20, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Will More States Follow California's Vaccination Crackdown?

    California Governor Jerry Brown recently signed one of the strictest school vaccination laws in the country, and many voters think more states will follow suit. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 28-29, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Can Obama Change Obamacare Without Congress’ OK?

    A federal judge today will hear arguments in a lawsuit that argues the Obama administration violated the Constitution when it changed portions of the new national health care law without Congress’ approval. It’s the first ever lawsuit by the full House of Representatives against a sitting president.

    Only 22% of Likely U.S. Voters told Rasmussen Reports last summer when the lawsuit was filed that the president should be able to change a law passed by Congress if he thinks the change will make the law work better. Sixty-three percent (63%) said any changes in a law should be approved first by Congress.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

  • Voters Expect Problems Ahead from Obamacare

    Voters still tend to think the new national health care law isn't working and expect things to get even worse. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 21 and 24, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Obamacare: Voters vs. SCOTUS

    President Obama yesterday celebrated the fifth anniversary of Congress’ passage of his national health care law, but most Americans still don’t like it.

    Fifty-two percent (52%) of Likely U.S. Voters view the law unfavorably, while 44% share a favorable opinion of Obamacare. This includes 15% with a Very Favorable view and 35% with a Very Unfavorable one.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

  • Should Obamacare Be Delayed Until Courts Are Through With It?

    The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments today in a case that would eliminate the taxpayer-funded subsidies for many of those who have signed up for health insurance through Obamacare. Nearly half of voters think it’s a good idea to hold up the health care law until court cases like this are resolved. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a   free daily e-mail update  ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 2-3, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Favor Putting Health Care Law On Hold Until Court Challenges End

    The U.S. Supreme Court has chosen to hear another legal challenge to the new national health care law, and nearly half of voters think it might be a good idea to put the brakes on Obamacare until all the court cases opposing it are through.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that a plurality (47%) of Likely U.S. Voters thinks implementation of Obamacare should be put on hold until all legal challenges are exhausted. Forty percent (40%) disagree, but 13% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a  free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).   Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 12-13, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 32% Think Americans Are Too Stupid to Understand Obamacare

    One-out-of-three voters agree that Americans are too dumb to comprehend the new national health care law.

    Jonathan Gruber, a key architect of the law, has been caught on video saying the law was deliberately written in a confusing way so “stupid” American voters wouldn’t understand the real cost to them and thus would be less likely to oppose it.

    Thirty-two percent (32%) of Likely U.S. Voters agree that the American people are too stupid to understand the true costs associated with Obamacare, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone poll. Just 52% disagree and another 16% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 12-13, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • How Important Is It on Election Day if A Congressman Voted for Obamacare?

    Voters are more skeptical than ever that Obamacare can be fixed any time soon but remain almost evenly divided on the impact the health care law will have on their voting decisions this November.

    Thirty-five percent (35%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they are more likely to vote for a member of Congress who supports the law, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Slightly more (38%) say they are less likely to vote for an Obamacare supporter. Nineteen percent (19%) say a Congress member’s position on the law will have no impact on their voting decision.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 1-2, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 49% Favor Religious Exemption from Contraceptive Mandate, 39% Oppose

    Half of voters agree with the U.S. Supreme Court that a business owner should be able to opt out of Obamacare’s contraceptive mandate if it violates his or her religious beliefs. But most also say a company’s level of contraceptive coverage is not that important to their decision to work there.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 43% of Likely U.S. Voters think businesses should be required by law to provide health insurance that covers all government-approved contraceptives for women without co-payments or other charges to the patient. Slightly more (47%) say companies should not be required to meet this contraceptive mandate included in the new national health care law. Ten percent (10%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 30 - July1, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.