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GUN CONTROL

  • 28% of Democrats Say It Should Be Illegal to Join the NRA

    The National Rifle Association is America’s largest gun rights organization with more than five million members. But a sizable number of Democrats views it as a terrorist group and believes it should be against the law for Americans to belong to pro-gun rights organizations like the NRA.

    Following several recent mass shootings, officials in San Francisco declared the NRA a domestic terrorist organization. The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that nearly one-out-of-three Likely Democratic Voters (32%) favor declaring the gun rights group a terrorist organization in the community where they live. Fourteen percent (14%) of Republicans and 20% of voters not affiliated with either major party agree. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 5 and 8, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Who Own Guns Feel Safer

    While Americans argue over the availability of guns, most of those with a gun in their house continue to say it makes them feel safer.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 39% of American Adults say they or someone in their household has a gun, down from 44% in February of last year. Fifty-four percent (54%) say they do not, while eight percent (8%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on August 8 and 11, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Still Question Motives of Politicians Who Raise Gun Issues

    Democrats were quick to blame President Trump and Republicans in general – and fundraise off the tragedy - following the recent mass shootings in Texas and Ohio. Perhaps this helps explain why most voters remain skeptical of how politicians respond to gun incidents.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 61% of Likely U.S. Voters believe most politicians raise gun-related issues just to get elected. Only 25% think they do so to address real problems. Still, this compares to 74% and 15% respectively a year ago, so there’s less skepticism after the latest killings. Fourteen percent (14%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 8 and 11, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Want More Gun Control But Admit Mass Shootings Can’t Be Stopped

    Support for more gun control has jumped to its highest level ever, but a sizable majority of voters also agree that it won’t stop all mass shootings like the ones this past weekend in Texas and Ohio.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 64% of Likely U.S. Voters now believe the United States needs stricter gun control laws. That’s up from a previous high of 57% in June 2016 following the massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. Thirty percent (30%) still oppose any further gun control. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 6-7, 2019 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Favor Social Media, Internet Checks For Gun License Applicants

    New York is considering a proposal that would require the government to check the social media posts going back three years and the internet searches for the past year of all gun license applicants to look for “any good cause for the denial of a license,” and voters are intrigued by the idea.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 46% of Likely U.S. Voters favor such a law in their state, while 39% are opposed. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 26-27, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 31% Blame Lack of Gun Control, Not Shooters in Gun Crimes

    Americans are closely divided over whether more stringent control of guns could have helped prevent this weekend’s massacre at a Pittsburgh synagogue. But one-third of Americans think access to guns is more at fault than the killers in incidents of this kind.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 46% of American Adults believe stricter gun control laws would help prevent shootings like the one in Pittsburgh. Nearly as many (43%), however, disagree. Ten percent (10%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on October 29-30, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Half Think Releasing 3D-Printed Gun Instructions Will Increase Crime

    Eight state attorneys general are fighting to stop the publication of blueprints for 3D-printed guns. Nearly half of voters think the availability of these plans will lead to an uptick in violent crime and a majority believes the United States, in general, needs stricter gun laws.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 48% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the availability of instructions for making 3D-printed guns will increase violent crime, while seven percent (7%) think it will decrease violent crime. Another 36% feel the release of the instructions will have no impact on violent crime. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 31-August 1, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Parkland, Florida: One Month Later

    Students across the country are planning  to participate in the National School Walkout for 17 minutes today to protest gun violence and honor the 17 victims of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida one month ago today.

    In the aftermath of the school shooting, 54% of Americans now think the children in most schools in America are at least somewhat safe, though that’s down 20 points from last April.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

  • 49% View NRA Favorably

    In the aftermath of the most recent school shooting in Florida, fewer voters have a positive view of the National Rifle Association (NRA).

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter and Facebook.

    The surveys of 1,000 Likely Voters each were conducted on February 27-28, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error for each survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Adults With School-Aged Kids Support Arming Teachers

    A proposal has been made to give bonuses to teachers who are specially trained to have guns in schools. Americans in general are torn about whether that’s a good idea, but a majority of adults with school-aged children like it.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 43% of American Adults favor a proposal to have trained teachers with guns in schools, while 48% oppose such a proposal. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on February 25-26, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.