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Category » Politics

MOST RECENT RELEASES

  • What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls

    Tuesday’s New Hampshire primary could sharply redefine the Republican race, but our polling suggests a Bernie Sanders win in the Granite State won’t remake the contest for the Democratic presidential nomination.

  • Clinton's Support Holds Steady Nationally

    And then there were two. Following a near-tie in the Iowa caucus Monday, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders went toe-to-toe last night in a debate in New Hampshire, the setting of next week’s primary. Have the dynamics of the race changed?

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 50% of Likely Democratic Voters would vote for Clinton if the Democratic presidential primary were held in their state today, while 32% would opt for Sanders. Twelve percent (12%) like some other candidate, and six percent (6%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 574 Likely Democratic Primary Voters was conducted on February 3-4, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Friday shows that 49% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Fifty percent (50%) disapprove (see trends).

    The latest figures include 27% who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 39% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -12.

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • Trump Change: ‘The Donald’ Takes A Fall

    Donald Trump insists his second-place showing in Monday’s Iowa caucus isn’t bad, but perception among his fellow Republicans that he will be the party’s presidential nominee has fallen sharply this week. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 3-4, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Smaller Government Wins Out With Voters

    Voters remain pessimistic about America's future and continue to believe cutting the size of the federal government may help. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on February 1-2, 2016. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Say No to Obama on Supreme Court

    Hillary Clinton seemed receptive the other day to naming President Obama to the U.S. Supreme Court if she is elected to succeed him this fall. Most voters, however, don’t approve of putting Obama on the high court and still aren’t interested in him running for a third term as president either.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 21% of Likely U.S. Voters think the next president of the United States should name Obama to the U.S. Supreme Court. Fifty-nine percent (59%) oppose such a nomination. Twenty percent (20%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 28 and 31, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Show Less Faith in American Society

    Voters remain less confident in society here at home.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters consider American society generally fair and decent, consistent with surveying for the past couple years but down from the low to mid-60s for several years prior to that.  Thirty-four percent (34%) think society in this country is generally unfair and discriminatory, down just a point from October’s all-time high.  Twelve percent (12%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on February 1-2, 2016. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 81% Think Federal Government is Corrupt

    Voters strongly believe the federal government is crooked. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 28 and 31, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Predict Next President Likely A Republican

    With just the first round of the presidential contest over, most voters still think the next occupant of the White House is likely to be a Republican.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 59% of Likely U.S. Voters say it’s likely that the next president after Barack Obama will come from the GOP. Just 36% say that’s unlikely. These findings include 25% who think a Republican president is Very Likely and only nine percent (9%) who consider it Not At All Likely. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on January 28 and 31, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Obama’s Full-Month Approval Improves In January

    When tracking President Obama’s job approval on a daily basis, people sometimes get so caught up in the day-to-day fluctuations that they miss the bigger picture. To look at the longer-term trends, Rasmussen Reports compiles the numbers on a full-month basis, and the results can be seen in the graphics below.