If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

Category » Politics

MOST RECENT RELEASES

  • Candidates Should Think Twice Before Endorsing Trump or Clinton

    Right now as other candidates consider whether to fall in line behind their party’s presumptive standard-bearer, it’s a curse more than a blessing to endorse Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 40% of Likely U.S. Voters are less likely to vote for any candidate who endorses Clinton, the likely Democratic presidential nominee. Just 26% are more likely to vote for that candidate, while 32% say a Clinton endorsement would have no impact on their voting decision. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 3-4, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Thursday shows that 49% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Fifty percent (50%) disapprove (see trends).

    The latest figures include 29% of all likely voters who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 38% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -9.

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • How Do Clinton, Trump Stack Up Next to Obama on National Security?

    Voters remain lukewarm about President Obama's national security policies and expect more of the same if Hillary Clinton moves back into the White House next January. Donald Trump, if elected, will definitely change things, voters say, but not necessarily for the best. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 1-2, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Think Government Too Powerful

    Americans continue to feel their freedom is at risk from an all-powerful government.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 62% of Likely U.S. Voters think there is too much government power and too little individual freedom in America today. Just eight percent (8%) disagree and think individuals have too much freedom and government not enough power. One-in-four (25%) think the balance is about right. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a  free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 27-28, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • How We Do Our Polls

    Some people have questioned our findings reported Monday that Donald Trump has edged slightly ahead of Hillary Clinton among likely voters nationally. Given the margin of error, it’s more accurate to call the race a tie.

  • The Battle of the Negatives Is About to Begin

    Barring an act of God, both major political parties now have their presidential nominees, and the mud’s about to fly.

    Hillary Clinton’s loss in yesterday’s Indiana primary is merely an annoying speed bump on her way to being the Democratic nominee. Donald Trump’s win in the Hoosiers’ GOP primary clears his way to the nomination.

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

  • Most GOPers Say Cruz, Kasich Should Quit; Dems Not So Eager to Lose Sanders

    Even before the votes are counted in today’s Indiana primaries, most Republicans think Ted Cruz and John Kasich should quit the race for their party’s presidential nomination. Democrats, on the other hand, aren’t so eager for Bernie Sanders to drop out.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 39% of Likely Republican Voters believe Cruz should remain in the race. Fifty-two percent (52%) say the Texas senator should quit the contest for the GOP nomination. Just five percent (5%) say he should run as a third-party candidate. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 27-28, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • More Voters See U.S. Constitution As Subject to Change

    Voters appear to be moving away from the idea that the U.S. Constitution should be interpreted as written and are now more likely to feel the nation's foundational document should change with the times. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on April 27-28, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 29% Say U.S. Heading in Right Direction

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey for the week ending April 29.

    This finding is up three points from the previous week. For five out of the first seven weeks this year, 30% or more said the country is heading the right way, a finding that was in the mid-20s nearly every week for the second half of last year. But the weekly finding has now been in the 20s since mid-February.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from April 24-29, 2016. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Trump 41%, Clinton 39%

    Last week, Rasmussen Reports gave voters the option of staying home on Election Day if Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are the big party nominees, and six percent (6%) said that’s what they intend to do for now. Clinton and Trump were tied with 38% support each; 16% said they would vote for some other candidate, and two percent (2%) were undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 27-28, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.