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Category » Politics

MOST RECENT RELEASES

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Friday shows that 43% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Fifty-seven percent (57%) disapprove.

    The latest figures for Trump include 26% who Strongly Approve of the way Trump is performing and 47% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -21. (see trends).

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily email update).

  • Voters Like Obamacare More, But Still Expect Cost Hikes

    Obamacare remains the law of the land, but President Trump is calling for repeal after Republicans failed to move a replacement bill through the Senate. More voters than ever view Obamacare favorably and fewer expect the quality of care to suffer, but most still predict health care costs will keep rising. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 18-19, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 26% Rate Trump-Russia Allegations Nation’s Biggest Problem

    Despite wall-to-wall media coverage of the Trump-Russia allegations, just one-out-of-four voters rate them as the most serious problem facing the nation. For most voters, economic issues, Obamacare and other problems are more serious.

    When Likely U.S. Voters are asked which of six major problems facing the nation concerns them most, the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 26% opt for the Trump administration’s alleged ties to Russia. Eighteen percent (18%) say the economy is their biggest concern, while 16% list Obamacare. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 16-17, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Few Think Government Has Consent of the Governed

    The Declaration of Independence says that governments derive their authority from the consent of the governed, but only one-in-four voters think the American government today has that consent.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 23% of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal government today has the consent of the governed. Fifty-seven percent (57%) do not, but 20% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on July 16-17, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Sorry, Kid Rock: Voters Still Aren’t Amped Up About Electing Entertainers

    Musician Kid Rock recently announced his intention to run for the U.S. Senate seat in Michigan next year, but despite a celebrity winning the White House, voters aren’t any more likely to say they’d vote for a prominent entertainer.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only seven percent (7%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they would be more likely to vote for a prominent entertainer who runs for public office. Fifty-one percent (51%) say they would be less likely to vote for an entertainer, while 38% say the candidate’s profession and prominence would have no influence on their vote. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 16-17, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Like Social Security More Than Ever

    Despite news from the newly released Social Security trustee’s report that the Social Security trust fund will be depleted by 2034, voters like the program more than ever before and have more faith that they will receive their promised benefits.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Don’t See Pence As A Trump Replacement

    Voters don’t think Vice President Mike Pence would do a better job than Donald Trump and say even if he did become chief executive, the media would be nearly as biased against him as they are against Trump.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 26% of Likely U.S. Voters believe Pence would make a better president than Trump. A plurality (45%) disagrees and says the former Indiana governor and congressman would not make a better chief executive. Slightly more (29%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 16-17, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Confidence That Congress Will Cut Budget Falls Sharply

    Despite their control of both chambers of Congress, Republicans have been unable to agree on any significant legislation this year and have failed to advance any of President Trump's reform agenda. While voters continue to favor major spending cuts, they are now much less confident than they were earlier in the year that those cuts are coming.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 38% of Likely U.S. Voters still think it’s at least somewhat likely that government spending will be significantly reduced over the next few years, but that's down from 54% who felt that way in March and from 53% in January. Reflecting the confidence voters felt in Trump's budget-cutting agenda with the GOP in control of Congress, the January finding represented a 24-point jump from March of last year. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 33% Say U.S. Heading in Right Direction

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 13.

    That’s down three points from the previous week and is the lowest finding since late May. This finding ran in the mid- to upper 20s for much of 2016, the closing year of Barack Obama's presidency.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from July 9-13, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Republicans Support Government Cuts—But Not Military

    Following a new CBO report on President Trump’s federal budget proposal, most voters still support thoughtful spending cuts in every area of the federal government, but differ across partisan lines over proposals to leave some cuts off the table.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 56% of all Likely U.S. Voters believe thoughtful spending cuts should be considered in every program of the federal government. Thirty-four percent (34%) disagree, while another 10% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.