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Category » Politics

MOST RECENT RELEASES

  • What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls

    Is the “Brexit” vote a sign of things to come? Our polling certainly suggests that most Republicans at least also have had their fill of rule by out-of-touch elites.

  • Voters Question Government’s Focus on Domestic Islamic Terrorism

    Following the shooting massacre at an Orlando gay nightclub by a man pledging allegiance to the radical Islamic State group (ISIS), fewer voters than ever think the government gives the right amount of attention to the threat of Islamic terrorism here at home.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 20% of Likely U.S. Voters think the government’s focus on domestic Islamic terrorism is about right. That’s down 11 points from March, just after the bombings of the airport and a metro station in Brussels, and the lowest level measured in surveys for over five years.

    Fifty-two percent ( 52%) say the government does not focus enough on this threat, up two points from the previous survey. But 25% think it focuses on the threat too much, up from 14% in March. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 22-23, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Friday shows that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Forty-nine percent (49%) disapprove (see trends).

    The latest figures include 30% who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 38% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -8.

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • Is Trump Already A Third-Party Candidate?

    Events in recent weeks suggest that Donald Trump is already running a third-party candidacy.

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

  • Support for More Gun Control Jumps to New High

    Support for additional gun control has risen to its highest level ever, but voters are evenly divided over whether more gun buying restrictions will help prevent future shootings like the one in Orlando. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 20-21, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • White House Watch: Clinton 44%, Trump 39%

    Hillary Clinton still holds a five-point lead over Donald Trump in Rasmussen Reports’ latest weekly White House Watch survey.

    For the second straight week  , Clinton draws 44% support to Trump’s 39% among Likely U.S. Voters, according to a new national telephone and online survey. Eleven percent (11%) prefer some other candidate, and six percent (6%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 20-21, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • GOPers Far More Critical of Party Leaders Than Democrats Are

    Though there’s been voter anger towards the leaders of both major political parties in this year’s highly contentious presidential primary season, Republican voters are far more likely than Democrats to say their party bosses are out of touch with the voter base. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 16 and 19, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 66% of GOP Voters Think Most Top Republicans Don’t Want Trump to be President

    Despite Donald Trump’s record turnout in this year’s primaries, most Republican voters are convinced that their party’s leaders don’t want him to get elected.

    Sixty-six percent (66%) of Likely Republican Voters believe that most top GOP leaders do not want Trump to be elected president of the United States. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 20% think most Republican leaders do want their party’s likely nominee to win the White House. Fourteen percent (14%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 16 and 19, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Party Affiliation Dictates Responses to Orlando

    Two competing narratives have emerged in the wake of the terrorist shooting massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida: President Obama and most Democratic leaders say it highlights the need for increased gun control, while most prominent Republicans say it represents the growing threat of domestic Islamic terrorism. Voters are divided along similar partisan lines when it comes to how best to prevent such attacks in the future.

    When given a choice, 36% of Likely U.S. Voters believe increased monitoring of individual Muslims with possible ties to terrorism will do the most to reduce the number of mass murders like the one in Orlando, but nearly as many (34%) think stricter gun control laws would be more effective. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 16% think better action to treat mental health issues would do the most in reducing massacres like Orlando, while 12% prefer something else not listed in the question. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 16 and 19, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Young Voters Favor A Gay President; Older Voters Do Not

    An openly gay candidate for the White House is still a long shot, but voters under 40 are a lot more enthusiastic about the prospect than their elders are. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on June 8-9, 2016 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.