If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

PUBLIC CONTENT

  • Voters Want More Say In Choosing Their Leaders

    While U.S. voters believe they have it better than citizens of other countries, they still don’t think they have enough influence over who gets elected in government.  

    Sixty-two percent (62%) of Likely U.S. Voters think voters in this country do not have enough say when it comes to choosing their leaders, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. Just five percent (5%) believe they have too much say, while 27% feel the level of choice is about right. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

     

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 950 Likely Voters was conducted on May 25-26, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Can Obama Change Obamacare Without Congress’ OK?

    A federal judge today will hear arguments in a lawsuit that argues the Obama administration violated the Constitution when it changed portions of the new national health care law without Congress’ approval. It’s the first ever lawsuit by the full House of Representatives against a sitting president.

    Only 22% of Likely U.S. Voters told Rasmussen Reports last summer when the lawsuit was filed that the president should be able to change a law passed by Congress if he thinks the change will make the law work better. Sixty-three percent (63%) said any changes in a law should be approved first by Congress.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Thursday shows that 47% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Fifty-two percent (52%) disapprove (see trends).

    The latest figures include 24% who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 38% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -14.

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Thursday shows that 47% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Fifty-two percent (52%) disapprove (see trends).

    The latest figures include 24% who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 38% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -14.

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Thursday shows that 47% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Obama's job performance. Fifty-two percent (52%) disapprove (see trends).

    The latest figures include 24% who Strongly Approve of the way Obama is performing as president and 38% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -14.

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily e-mail update).

  • Your Rights vs. Your Safety – You Decide

    The debate over the Patriot Act and the National Security Agency’s snooping on millions of Americans is all about the balance between national security and individual rights. Similarly, increasing complaints about urban policing have us discussing the conflict between those rights and public safety.

    But voters aren’t much help. A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that they remain closely divided on both questions as they have been in regular surveying for the past four years.

    Twenty-seven percent (27%) of Likely U.S. Voters believe that in the United States today our legal system worries too much about protecting individual rights at the expense of national security. But 32% feel that the legal system worries too much about protecting national security instead. Another 32% think the balance between the two is about right.

    Twenty-nine percent (29%) say the U.S. legal system worries too much about protecting individual rights at the expense of public safety. Nearly as many (27%) disagree and think the system errs on the side of public safety instead. Again, one-third (35%) of voters believe the balance is about right. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 950 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on May 25-26, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • House 2016: Gridlock Ahead for a Possible Clinton Administration By Kyle Kondik

    If Hillary Clinton wins the White House, there's a decent chance that she will achieve a historic first, but not the one everybody talks about.

    Clinton could become the first Democratic president in the party's nearly two century-long history* to never control the House of Representatives while she's in office.

  • Voters Still Question Supreme Court's Political Biases

    Several major rulings are expected heading into the final month of the U.S. Supreme Court’s current term, including ones on same-sex marriage and President Obama's health care law, but few voters think the court is balanced politically.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 25% of Likely U.S. Voters consider the Supreme Court’s ideology to be about right. Thirty-five percent (35%) say the high court is too liberal. That’s up from 32% in February and the highest finding since December 2013. Twenty-nine percent (29%) say the court is too conservative, generally consistent with surveys over the past year. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on May 25-26, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Federal Court Echoes Voters In Halting Obama’s Amnesty

    President Obama’s plan to protect up to five million illegal immigrants from deportation has run into more legal trouble. A federal appeals court on Tuesday refused to lift a hold on the president’s executive action, and the next stop is likely to be the U.S. Supreme Court.

    Rasmussen Reports surveying finds that more than half of voters remain opposed to Obama’s plan to allow the illegal immigrants to remain in this country and apply for jobs. Opposition has risen since the president announced his action last November.

  • How the World Has Changed Since World War I By Michael Barone

    Over the past year, I've been reading books inspired by the centenary of World War I, a war with horrific casualties painful to contemplate. What helps in comprehending the scale of the slaughter is a book by one of Bill Gates' favorite authors, the Canadian academic Vaclav Smil, "Creating the Twentieth Century: Technical Innovations of 1867-1914 and Their Lasting Impact."

    Smil leads the reader through the invention and development of electricity, oil production and distribution, the automobile, steelmaking, the telephone, the airplane and the production of synthetic ammonia -- to his mind the most important because without it agriculture couldn't feed the world's 6 billion people.