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Last modified: 09/06/2018 08:41 am

Election season is upon us again, two years after one of the wildest roller coaster political campaigns in recent memory. This time it’s Congress on the ballot, not Donald Trump versus Hillary Clinton. Yet President Trump is still on the ballot – his agenda, his policies, his future.

Last modified: 08/29/2018 08:20 am

Are those who question the severity of global warming worse than Nazis? I wouldn't think so, but YouTube, owned by Google, seems to.

I wrote last week that YouTube added a Wikipedia link about global warming to videos like ones I do about climate change.

Last modified: 08/23/2018 08:30 am

Fewer voters now say they’re following the news more closely than they were a year ago, but they still overwhelmingly consider the news they are getting reliable.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 38% of Likely U.S. Voters are following the news more closely than they were a year ago, down from 47% who said the same thing at this time in 2017. Sixteen percent (16%) are following the news less closely than they were a year ago, up from 12% in 2017, while 45% are paying about the same amount of attention to the news today as they were 12 months ago. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

(Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 16 & 19, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 08/22/2018 02:05 pm
Social media giant Facebook has been rocked by bombshell reports that the data of as many as 87 million users was breached in direct conflict with the company's privacy policies and CEO Mark
Last modified: 08/22/2018 09:06 am

YouTube just added an "information panel" to all my videos about climate change.    

Last modified: 08/21/2018 01:57 pm

Following the “Unite the Right’s” first anniversary white supremacy rally earlier this month that was counter-protested by groups like so-called “antifa”, voters think police do a good job dealing with violent protesters but don’t think the media sides with them.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 48% of Likely U.S. Voters think most reporters identify more with the protesters than the police in violent protest situations, little changed from a year ago after the initial “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. Just 14% think the media sides more with the police, up from nine percent (9%) of American Adults last August, while 27% think they identify with both, down from 34%. Another 11% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project.   Learn more about how you can contribute

(Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on August 14-15, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 08/14/2018 08:36 am

Like President Trump and California Governor Jerry Brown, voters disagree on the cause of the wildfires raging in northern California, but most think this is a worse season for fires than usual.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters believe there have been more wildfires this year than in past years. Only 28% think there's just been more media coverage of the fires than there has been in the past. Eighteen percent (18%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project.   Learn more about how you can contribute

(Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on August 8-9, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 08/02/2018 02:35 pm

While opponents of President Trump are forcing the Democratic Party to the far left, Republicans are quite happy with the direction the president is heading.

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute

Last modified: 07/26/2018 01:49 pm

It wasn’t exactly the plot of the old James Bond thriller, “From Russia with Love,” Monday at the Helsinki summit between Presidents Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin, but for the rest of the week on TV and in print, it seemed like it could have been.

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

Last modified: 07/25/2018 01:07 pm

In its ongoing fight against "fake news," Facebook has removed several pages from its site, but many users are angry that they've yet to remove a page known for spreading conspiracy theories and unsubstantiated rumors. Despite the outcry, though, most users still think it's best to let speech go unfettered on social media.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 59% agree that owners of social media should allow free speech without interference, while 25% think it is better if they regulate what is posted to make sure some people are not offended. These findings show little change from surveys since July 2016. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.  

(Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The national survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on July 19 & 22, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.