If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

Site Search

Search for "media bias" returned 389 matches:


Sort by modified date | Sort by relevance

Last modified: 11/30/2018 08:19 am

New York is considering a proposal that would require the government to check the social media posts going back three years and the internet searches for the past year of all gun license applicants to look for “any good cause for the denial of a license,” and voters are intrigued by the idea.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 46% of Likely U.S. Voters favor such a law in their state, while 39% are opposed. Sixteen percent (16%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on November 26-27, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 11/19/2018 08:29 am

CNN reporter Jim Acosta had his White House press credentials stripped after grilling President Trump in a contentious exchange at a press conference earlier this month, but a judge last week ordered the White House to reinstate those credentials. Voters are split on whether Acosta’s credentials should have been revoked, but they’re suspicious of the media’s motives for reporting stories the way they do.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 42% of Likely U.S. Voters agree with the White House’s decision to suspend Acosta’s press credentials, but just as many (44%) disagree with the decision. Another 13% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 14-15, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 11/16/2018 01:19 pm

News conferences are a double oxymoron. Pressers aren't conferences; conferences involve back-and-forth communication. Nor do they have anything to do with news. News is neither created nor conveyed at a press conference.

The one place in the world where news is least likely to happen is a press conference. If I were in charge of a media organization, the last thing I'd spend money on would be a White House correspondent whose role is to sit politely holding up his or her hand, hoping like a compliant schoolchild to be called upon, begging for the privilege of being lied to.

Last modified: 11/16/2018 09:16 am

Last week, the White House revoked the press pass of CNN's chief White House correspondent, Jim Acosta, and denied him access to the building.

CNN responded by filing suit in federal court against the president.

Last modified: 11/08/2018 05:11 pm
. With the road kill of 16 primary challengers and one of the best known political figures of the last 25 years in his rear-view, Trump has identified his newest opponent, the media. In his first press
Last modified: 11/06/2018 10:29 am

Most agree President Trump is calling the shots right now, but if Democrats win the House in today’s elections, voters say that’s all going to change.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 58% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the president is setting the national agenda in Washington, D.C. these days. In far distant second is Congress with 11% support. Nine percent (9%) say the national media is setting the nation’s agenda, while just six percent (6%) see the Democratic opposition filling that role. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 4-5, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 11/01/2018 08:30 am

Following the most recent mass shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Americans still worry the media’s coverage of such violence inspires copycats.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 33% of American Adults think the media covers mass shootings like the one in Pittsburgh too much, though that’s down from 44% following the shooting in southern California in 2014  and 54% following the 2013 shooting at a Washington, DC Navy Yard.

A plurality (46%) now thinks the level of media coverage for mass shooting events is about right, up from 33% four years ago, while 15% think there isn’t enough coverage. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on October 29-30, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 10/30/2018 10:33 am

With midterm elections around the corner, most voters think the media is more interested in stirring the pot than reporting on candidate’s platforms.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 52% of Likely U.S. Voters think, in covering most candidates, the media is more interested in creating controversies about them than where they stand on the issues. Forty-three percent (43%) think the media is more interested in where candidates stand on the issues. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.

(Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 25 & 26, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

Last modified: 10/26/2018 01:58 pm

The U.S. occupation of Afghanistan is in its 17th year, with no end in sight. The U.S. has killed 1 million Iraqis over the last 15 years. We're killing Syrians, Yemenis and Somalis. None of the victims threatened us.   

Last modified: 10/01/2018 08:25 am

Americans agree that social media sites need to do a better job of separating fact from opinion in their feeds but have very little confidence that they'll do it fairly.

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 70% of American Adults think social media and news sites should clearly separate news pieces from opinion, editorial and commentary. Just 16% disagree. Thirteen percent (13%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

Rasmussen Reports invites you to be a part of our first-ever Citizen-Sourced National Midterm Election Polling Project. Learn more about how you can contribute.  

(Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on September 25-26, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.