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MOST RECENT RELEASES

  • Republicans, Democrats Losing Faith In Their Congressional Leaders

    Republican voters appear to have lost the enthusiasm they showed earlier this year about their Congressional leaders, and now Democrats are following suit.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 67% of Likely Republican Voters now believe Republicans in Congress have lost touch with GOP voters throughout the nation over the past several years. That’s up from 51% in February, just weeks into the new Congress. Still, the latest finding remains below the high of 76% measured in early 2016.

    Just 25% of Republicans now think their representatives have done a good job representing the party’s values, down from 40% in the previous survey but more consistent with earlier polling. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 20 and 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Tuesday shows that 42% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Fifty-eight percent (58%) disapprove.

    The latest figures for Trump include 25% who Strongly Approve of the way Trump is performing and 47% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -22. (see trends).

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily email update).

  • AG Sessions More Popular Than Obama's Holder, Lynch

    President Trump last week called Attorney General Jeff Sessions “beleaguered” and said he would have picked someone else if he knew Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia investigation. Voters see Sessions more favorably than either of President Obama's attorneys general but not by much.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters have a favorable opinion of Sessions, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey. Forty-seven percent (47%) view the former Alabama attorney general and U.S. senator unfavorably. This includes 14% with a Very Favorable opinion and 28% with a Very Unfavorable one. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 20 & 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 33% Say U.S. Heading in Right Direction

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 20.  

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from July 16-20, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 55% Say Congress More Responsive to Media Than to Voters

    Most voters think Congress doesn’t listen to them and is more interested in making the media happy.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 55% of Likely U.S. Voters believe what the media thinks matters more to the average member of Congress than what voters think. Still, that’s an improvement from 62% who felt that way in October 2009 during President Obama’s first year in office.  Just 30% say the average member cares more what voters think. Fifteen percent (15%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 20 & 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls

    Repeal, replace, tweak or do nothing at all? The fate of Obamacare seems more uncertain than ever.

  • Voters Like Obamacare More, But Still Expect Cost Hikes

    Obamacare remains the law of the land, but President Trump is calling for repeal after Republicans failed to move a replacement bill through the Senate. More voters than ever view Obamacare favorably and fewer expect the quality of care to suffer, but most still predict health care costs will keep rising. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 18-19, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 26% Rate Trump-Russia Allegations Nation’s Biggest Problem

    Despite wall-to-wall media coverage of the Trump-Russia allegations, just one-out-of-four voters rate them as the most serious problem facing the nation. For most voters, economic issues, Obamacare and other problems are more serious.

    When Likely U.S. Voters are asked which of six major problems facing the nation concerns them most, the latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 26% opt for the Trump administration’s alleged ties to Russia. Eighteen percent (18%) say the economy is their biggest concern, while 16% list Obamacare. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 16-17, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Few Think Government Has Consent of the Governed

    The Declaration of Independence says that governments derive their authority from the consent of the governed, but only one-in-four voters think the American government today has that consent.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 23% of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal government today has the consent of the governed. Fifty-seven percent (57%) do not, but 20% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on July 16-17, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Sorry, Kid Rock: Voters Still Aren’t Amped Up About Electing Entertainers

    Musician Kid Rock recently announced his intention to run for the U.S. Senate seat in Michigan next year, but despite a celebrity winning the White House, voters aren’t any more likely to say they’d vote for a prominent entertainer.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only seven percent (7%) of Likely U.S. Voters say they would be more likely to vote for a prominent entertainer who runs for public office. Fifty-one percent (51%) say they would be less likely to vote for an entertainer, while 38% say the candidate’s profession and prominence would have no influence on their vote. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 16-17, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.