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MOOD OF AMERICA

  • Voters Still Question Supreme Court's Political Biases

    Several major rulings are expected heading into the final month of the U.S. Supreme Court’s current term, including ones on same-sex marriage and President Obama's health care law, but few voters think the court is balanced politically.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that only 25% of Likely U.S. Voters consider the Supreme Court’s ideology to be about right. Thirty-five percent (35%) say the high court is too liberal. That’s up from 32% in February and the highest finding since December 2013. Twenty-nine percent (29%) say the court is too conservative, generally consistent with surveys over the past year. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on May 25-26, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 27% Say U.S. Heading in Right Direction

    Twenty-seven percent (27%) of Likely U.S. Voters now think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey for the week ending May 21.

    This finding is down two points from 29% the week before. In January and February, 30% or more of voters said the country was heading in the right direction after generally being in the mid- to high 20s since mid-June 2013.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The national telephone survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from May 17-21, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • More Voters See Need for U.S. To Be World's Top Cop

    In his first major foreign policy speech since announcing his run for president, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida echoed the views of some of his Republican competitors that America must renew its military and moral leadership but stopped short of saying it should be the world’s policeman. More voters than ever think the U.S. military is overstretched these days, but slightly more also think America has a responsibility to maintain order globally.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 56% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the U.S. military is overstretched, up five points from earlier this year. Just 27% now think America’s armed forces can adequately handle the number of missions it has. That’s down from a high of 33% in January. Seventeen percent (17%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 13-14, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • Generic Congressional Ballot: Republicans 38%, Democrats 38%

    Republicans and Democrats remain tied on the latest Generic Congressional Ballot.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey for the week ending May 14 finds that 38% of Likely U.S. Voters would vote for the Republican candidate in their district's congressional race if the election were held today, while another 38% would choose the Democrat instead. Twenty-three percent (23%) prefer a third-party candidate or are undecided.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The national telephone survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from May 10-14, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Demographic details and trends for this survey are available for Platinum Members only.

  • Voters Like Their Own Congressmen More

    Congress’s ratings are still nothing to celebrate, but voters have a slightly more favorable opinion of their local representative.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that just 10% of Likely U.S. Voters rate Congress’s performance overall as good or excellent. That’s down from 12% in March and from an over three-year high of 16% in December.

    Most voters (59%), however, still give Congress a poor rating, up three points from last month. Before January, though, this figure had regularly run in the 60s and low 70s since mid-2012.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on May 3-4, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • Voters Still Don't Like Congress' Top Leaders

    They've all been reelected several times, but the four top congressional leaders remain an unpopular choice among voters nationwide.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters have an unfavorable opinion of House Speaker John Boehner, and 53% say the same of House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi. Unfavorables are only slightly lower for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (46%) and his Democratic counterpart, Minority Leader Harry Reid (50%), but that's probably in part because they are not as well-known to voters. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on April 27-28, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • Voters Are Slightly More Confident in the Days Ahead

    Voters are a bit more optimistic about the future, but they still want less government in their lives.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 37% of Likely U.S. Voters now think America’s best days are in the future, up five points from January and the highest level of optimism in more than two years. But 45% still think the country’s best days have already come and gone.  Eighteen percent (18%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on April 13-14, 2015. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

    Additional information from this survey and a full demographic breakdown are available to Platinum Members only.

  • Is the Federal Government A Growing Threat?

    Voter distrust in the federal government continues to climb.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook

    The national survey of 800 Likely Voters was conducted on February 12-13, 2015 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3.5 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Which Party Do Voters Trust More? Depends on the Issue

    Voters continue to see Republicans as the party to trust when it comes to economic growth, fiscal restraint and national security. Democrats remain their first choice, however, on issues like health care, education and the environment. 

    New national telephone surveying finds that Likely U.S. Voters trust the GOP more on eight of 15 major issues regularly tracked by Rasmussen Reports - the economy, national security, Afghanistan, taxes, job creation, government spending, small business and gun control. Democrats hold the trust advantage on seven issues - energy, immigration, government ethics and corruption, health care, Social Security, education and the environment. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook  

    Three national surveys of 1,000 Likely Voters each were conducted on December 7-8, 11-12 & 15-16, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters List Economy, Health Care, Spending As Top Issues

    The economy continues to be the top issue on voters’ minds, but government spending has now worked its way into the top three on the list of 15 major issues regularly tracked by Rasmussen Reports.

    Seventy-two percent (72%) of Likely U.S. Voters say the economy is Very Important in terms of how they will vote in the next congressional election, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter and Facebook.

    The surveys of 1,000 Likely Voters each were conducted on June 4-5, 8-9 and 10-11, 2014 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error for each survey is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.