If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

OCTOBER 2012

  • 30% Say Election Is Causing More Stress In Their Family

    One-in-four Americans (27%) say the upcoming election has negatively affected their personal relationship with a friend or family member, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey.

    Forty-five percent (45%) say they have gotten into a heated argument with a friend or family member about the election. Most (52%) have not. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Perhaps, not surprisingly, men (53%) are more likely to have gotten in a heated argument than women (39%) are.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted on October 24-25, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 60% Say Federal Government Does Not Have the Consent of the Governed

    Even with Americans poised to pick a president and one-third of the nation’s senators, most voters continue to feel the federal government does not have the official approval of its citizenry.

    One of the central tenets of the Declaration of Independence is that “governments derive their only just powers from the consent of the governed,” but just 25% of Likely U.S. Voters think the federal government today has that consent. Sixty percent (60%) believe the federal government does not have the consent of the governed. Fifteen percent (15%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

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    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 21-22, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 57% Think U.S. Elections Are Fair

    With Election Day less than two weeks away, more voters than ever believe elections are fair but still think the rules are rigged to help incumbent members of Congress.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 57% of Likely U.S. Voters believe American elections are fair. Thirty percent (30%) think elections are not fair to voters. Thirteen percent (13%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Take the Rasmussen Challenge!  Answers must be submitted by 11:59pm ET on Wednesday, October 24. 

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 21-22, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Who Will Win? 51% Say Obama, 39% Romney

    Fifty-one percent (51%) of Likely U.S. Voters still think President Obama is the likely winner of the presidential race, while 39% expect Mitt Romney to come out on top, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey.

    Confidence in Romney has been inching up and is now at its highest level in surveys since late August. The 12-point gap between the candidates is the narrowest yet, down from 20 points just two weeks ago. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

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    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 19-20, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Tea Party, Liberal Are Still Most Negative Political Labels

    Linking a candidate to the Tea Party is still the most negative political label as far as voters are concerned, with liberal number two on the negative scale. Conservative and moderate are the most positive labels. But, not surprisingly, there remains a strong difference of opinion between Republicans and Democrats.

    Rasmussen Reports periodically asks Likely U.S. Voters to rate political labels, and the latest national telephone survey finds that 44% regard Tea Party as a negative description for a candidate. Twenty-six percent (26%) consider it a positive and another 26% somewhere in between. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    How did you do in this week’s Rasmussen Challenge? Check the leaderboard.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update ? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 15-16, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

  • 71% Favor Requiring Voter ID at the Polls

    Support remains high for requiring voters to prove their identity at the polls, but more voters than ever believe requiring photo identification is discriminatory. However, there are wide partisan differences of opinion on this issue.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 66% of Likely U.S. Voters believe voter fraud is a serious problem in America today, with 33% who say it is a Very Serious one. Twenty-eight percent (28%) disagree, but that includes just 12% who say it’s Not At All Serious. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Take the Rasmussen Challenge for a chance to win an IPad.  This week's entries will be accepted until 11:59pm ET tonight.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 11-12, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 51% Think Ambassador’s Murder Will Hurt Obama At the Polls

    Voters are now more critical of how the Obama administration has handled the situation in Libya, including the murder of the U.S. ambassador there, and most think it will hurt President Obama’s chances for reelection. However, they are slightly more confident in the president than Mitt Romney to handle events in the Middle East.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 35% of Likely U.S. Voters now rate the way the administration has responded to the situation in Libya as good or excellent. That’s down nine points from 44% in mid-September just after the murder of Ambassador Christopher Stevens. Forty percent (40%) view the administration’s Libya response as poor, up from 34% a month ago. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Win an IPad: Take the Rasmussen Challenge.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters nationwide was conducted on October 13-14, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Only 23% Say U.S. Spends Too Much on National Security

    The level of defense spending has become a hot campaign issue with Republicans opposing scheduled upcoming military budget cuts. Just 23% of voters now say the United States spends too much on national security, the lowest finding over the past year of regular tracking.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 43% of Likely U.S. Voters say the country spends about the right amount on national security, while 27% say it does not spend enough. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    How did you do in this week’s Rasmussen Challenge? Check the leaderboard.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 7-8, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

  • 48% Rate A Candidate’s Religious Faith Important to Their Vote

    When John F. Kennedy ran for the presidency in 1960, many considered his Catholic faith a total disqualifier. Now fewer than half of voters regard a candidate’s religious beliefs as important at all to how they will vote, much less the deciding factor.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 48% of Likely U.S. Voters now rate a candidate’s religious faith as important to their vote, while slightly more (51%) do not.

    These figures include only 19% for whom the faith of a candidate is Very Important. That’s down 16 points, though, from 35% in November 2006.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    How did you do in this week’s Rasmussen Challenge? Check the leaderboard.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on October 3-4, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

  • 65% Think Media Reports More on Negative Campaigning Than on Issues

    Most Americans already think there are more negative campaign advertisements on television this year, but they also feel the media focuses more on negative campaigning. 

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 65% of American Adults believe the media reports more on negative campaigning than on issues raised by candidates. Just 18% think the media reports on the issues more, but just as many (17%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    Win an iPad: The Rasmussen Challenge! This week's entries will be accepted until 11:59 pm ET tonight.

    The survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted on September 26-27, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.