If it's in the News, it's in our Polls. Public opinion polling since 2003.

 

The Four Things Hillary Could do to Close the Deal Against Trump

A Commentary By Ted Rall

Friday, October 21, 2016

She's ahead in the polls by roughly three to four points. Given her opposition, however, Hillary Clinton ought be doing a lot better than that.

Consider Clinton's structural advantages over Donald Trump.

She's been wildly outspending him in televised political advertising. She has campaign field offices in most counties; he doesn't have any in most states. The news media despises him.

Then consider her personal advantages.

Trump is a novice, never having run for political office. She has served in the cabinet, presented herself for the Senate twice, run for president, weathered countless scandals and political storms. Whereas he rants and raves incoherently, her experience has taught her how to debate, crisis manage, issue sound bites, and carefully calibrate her every phrase for maximum impact and minimum risk. His main advantage is the perception of authenticity -- and it's a big one, having gotten him where he is now -- but it has come at a huge price as all his years of running off at the mouth on and off camera are coming home to roost weeks before election day.

Donald Trump has infuriated more than half the voters: women. He has insulted one out of 10 male and female Americans: Latinos, and let's not forget Muslims.

Given all that, why is he doing so well? Why is she doing so badly -- or more accurately, so not well?

Part of Clinton's problem is personality. Truth be told, she really isn't "likeable enough."

"The vote for president is a 'feel' vote," Chris Cillizza wrote in The Washington Post. "Do you think this person is someone who understands you and the problems (and hopes and dreams) you have for yourself and your children?" Polls have consistently shown that most Americans think she doesn't.

It's not all sexism: Clinton yells into microphones and overly enunciates. Her voice is objectively irritating. Then there's her incredibly ugly, unbelievably hideous wardrobe: it's hard to like someone who makes your eyes burn.

But let's face it. Hillary Clinton, probably like you and definitely like me, can't do anything about her personality. At 68, that stuff is baked in. Still, there's a lot she could do to close the deal against Donald Trump -- to widen her within-the-margin-of-statistical-error lead to a chasm, the insurmountable landslide that her institutional and other advantages would have guaranteed a better candidate.

It's about policy, stupid.

Recommendation No. 1: Guarantee Bernie Sanders a high-profile position in the cabinet. (She should have made him vice president, but it's too late for that.)

Even after the Democratic convention in which Sanders endorsed her, more than a third of Bernie voters -- roughly 1/6 of the electorate -- still weren't behind her. Annoyed that Clinton didn't grant any significant concessions to the party's progressive base, many of them will vote for Jill Stein or stay home. I've been prognosticating about American politics for decades, and I've never been more certain of a prediction: a firm guarantee that Bernie Sanders will have a seat at the table for the next four years would singlehandedly put an end to Trump's chances.

Recommendation No. 2: Promise to be a one-term president.

One thing that drives voters crazy is politicians who spend most of their time in office weighing every decision against their future reelection campaign. Nothing would do more than to allay voters' worries that she is a slave of her Wall Street masters than to turn herself into a lame duck on day one -- and free herself of the burden of worrying about 2020. Few presidents get much done during their last four years. Reagan, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush all saw their second terms tarnished by scandal.

Recommendation No. 3: Turn her weaknesses into strengths by promising to finish her own unfinished business.

One of Hillary Clinton's biggest weaknesses is her support of NAFTA and other job-killing "free trade" deals. Since she can't run away from her record, why not embrace it by calling for a major national jobs retraining and financial assistance program for people who lose their jobs to globalization, as well as a $25/hour minimum wage? Similarly, her awkward reluctance to concede that Obamacare is too expensive should be replaced by an acknowledgement of what everyone already knows -- the Affordable Care Act should have at least included a "public option" -- and that she will add one in January. She could also claimed that she learned a valuable lesson from her email scandal; she could promise to be the most transparent president in history by putting a live camera in the oval office and the cabinet, and promising not to conduct government business (other than national security matters) in private.

Recommendation No. 4: No more optional wars.

On foreign policy, Hillary Clinton has quite the reputation as a warmonger. She voted for wars against Afghanistan and Iraq, even though neither had anything to do with 9/11. As Secretary of State she encouraged President Obama to finance the Islamist fundamentalists who turned Libya and Syria into hell. Now she's saber-rattling with Russia. Americans hate these endless wars. And they do us a lot more harm than good. Hillary Clinton should issue in October Surprise: if elected, she should say, she will never deploy American military power anywhere on earth other than to directly defend the American homeland.

I know she probably won't take my advice. But here's the thing: she'll win if she does.

Ted Rall is author of "Trump: A Graphic Biography," an examination of the life of the Republican presidential nominee in comics form. Please support Ted by sponsoring his work on Patreon.

COPYRIGHT 2016 CREATORS.COM

See Other Political Commentaries.

See Other Commentaries by Ted Rall.

Views expressed in this column are those of the author, not those of Rasmussen Reports. Comments about this content should be directed to the author or syndicate.

Rasmussen Reports is a media company specializing in the collection, publication and distribution of public opinion information.

We conduct public opinion polls on a variety of topics to inform our audience on events in the news and other topics of interest. To ensure editorial control and independence, we pay for the polls ourselves and generate revenue through the sale of subscriptions, sponsorships, and advertising. Nightly polling on politics, business and lifestyle topics provides the content to update the Rasmussen Reports web site many times each day. If it's in the news, it's in our polls. Additionally, the data drives a daily update newsletter and various media outlets across the country.

Some information, including the Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll and commentaries are available for free to the general public. Subscriptions are available for $4.95 a month or 34.95 a year that provide subscribers with exclusive access to more than 20 stories per week on upcoming elections, consumer confidence, and issues that affect us all. For those who are really into the numbers, Platinum Members can review demographic crosstabs and a full history of our data.

To learn more about our methodology, click here.