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  • Taxpayers Still Feel Gypped Compared to Others

    Few Americans think those richer or poorer than they are pay as much as they do in taxes.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that only 20% of American Adults believe someone who makes twice as much as they do pays twice as much in taxes. Forty-eight percent (48%) say that person pays less than half as much in taxes. Only 11% think they pay more than twice as much. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on March 26-27, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Americans Squawk Less About Taxes

    They still have doubts, but Americans are more confident these days that they aren't being overtaxed.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 45% of American Adults still say, compared to people who make more or less than they do, they are paying more than their fair share of taxes. But that’s down from 55% a year ago and the lowest finding in surveying since April 2009. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on March 22-23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Think Fed, Big Banks Too Close for Comfort

    In response to the growing economy, the Federal Reserve Board is cautiously raising interest rates for the first time in years. Voters are slightly less wary of the economic power the Fed chairman has, but most still think the Fed is too cozy with big banking interests.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 59% of Likely U.S. Voters believe big banks and other major financial institutions have too much insider influence over the actions of the Federal Reserve. This finding has changed little since we first asked it five years ago. Just 20% disagree, while 22% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 22-23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Americans Slow Down on Paying Their Taxes

    Americans have put the brakes on doing their income taxes after getting off to a record start.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that only 47% of American Adults have already filed their income taxes. That’s up just six points from 41% a month ago which was the highest percentage of Americans who have filed before March in surveys since 2009.  Still, 37% of those who have yet to file say they plan to do so by the April 15 deadline. Nine percent (9%) now plan to seek an extension, up from five percent last month. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on March 22-23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Republicans Favor Major Cut in Corporate Tax Rate, Democrats Don’t

    The United States has the highest corporate tax rate in the developed world, but most voters don’t know that. Voters tend to see cutting the tax rate as an economic plus but are evenly divided over President Trump’s plan to cut it by over half.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 48% of Likely U.S. Voters are aware that the tax rate on corporations in the United States is higher than in most other nations. Twenty-three percent (23%) incorrectly think the U.S. corporate tax rate is lower than in most nations, while nine percent (9%) say it’s about the same. One-in-five (21%), however, are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on March 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Americans Are More Worried About An IRS Audit

    Few Americans admit to cheating on their taxes, but more are worried about getting audited by the IRS than have been in the past.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 23% of American Adults are at least somewhat concerned that the Internal Revenue Service will audit their taxes this year, with seven percent (7%) who are Very Concerned. That’s up significantly from 14% and three percent (3%) respectively last year and the highest level of concern in 10 years of regular surveying.

    Still, most (72%) are not concerned about getting audited. But that’s down from 83% last year and includes only 27% who are Not At All Concerned. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on February 26-27, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Americans Are Upping The Pace on Tax Filing

    Tax Day is still weeks away, but Americans are filing their income taxes at a much faster rate than they have in previous years.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 41% of American Adults have already filed their income taxes. That’s up from 27% this time last year  and is the highest percentage of Americans who have filed before March in surveys since 2009.  Slightly more (47%) say they will file by the April 15 deadline, while only five percent (5%) plan to get an extension. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on February 22-23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Say No to Higher Taxes For Infrastructure Projects

    If President Trump moves ahead with a major federal plan to rebuild infrastructure in the United States, most Americans don't think they should have to pay any extra taxes to fund it.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 45% of American Adults are willing to pay more in taxes each year to upgrade and improve America's infrastructure, although that includes 14% who are only willing to pay $50 more per year and 15% who would agree to pay $100 more in taxes annually. Ten percent (10%) say they would be willing to pay an additional $250 in taxes each year for upgraded and improved infrastructure, and six percent (6%) are willing to pay an extra $500 or more annually.

    But 52% draw the line at paying more, with 19% who are willing to pay nothing more in taxes each year and 33% who say new costs for upgrading and improving infrastructure should be offset by other spending cuts. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on February 14-15, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Want More Regulation of Financial System

    Voters are more confident in the government's oversight of the banking industry but also look more favorably on increasing that supervision. (To see survey question wording, click here).

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on February 12-13, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Consumer Spending Update: More Confidence, More Spending?

    For the fourth straight month, the Rasmussen Reports Consumer Spending Update shows confidence in the economy trending upward - with an amazing 25-point overall increase in economic confidence and a 26-point increase in confidence in the direction of the economy since the 2016 presidential elections.